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Hope rises at WTC as downtown's skyline takes new shape

WTC

WTC Photo Credit: Getty Images

The buildings at the World Trade Center are changing the downtown skyline and filling the gap left by the original Twin Towers. Here’s a look at the site plan and the progress of construction:

1.

1 World Trade Center
Date construction began: Concrete poured in 2006
Completion date: End of 2013
Construction progress: 80 stories tall, on its way to 104
When it’s done: Will be 1,776 feet tall, including antenna; will be the tallest building in the United States; will include an observation deck.
Space: 2.6 million square feet — 1 million square feet of which will house magazine company Condé Nast.
Architect: David Childs

2.

2 World Trade Center
Date construction began: Foundation work started June 1, 2010
Completion date: Undetermined
Construction progress: Steel columns have been erected to street level; three of the four underground levels are complete. Construction will remain at street level until tenants have signed on to take space in the tower.
When it’s done: Will stand 88 stories tall at 1,349 feet, making it the second-tallest skyscraper in the city.
Space: 2.8 million square feet of office space; 145,000 square feet of retail
Architect: Foster and Partners

3.

3 World Trade Center
Date construction began: Summer 2008
Completion date: Undetermined
Construction progress: Concrete core will be at street level by Sunday. Five stories of retail space will be erected, but further construction will be on hold until further office-space needs are identified.
When it’s done: Will be 80 stories, 1,170 feet tall.
Space: 2.5 million square feet of office space; 150,000 square feet of retail
Architect: Richard Rogers of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

4.

4 World Trade Center
Date construction began: February 2008
Completion date: Fall 2013
Construction progress: Steel columns have been erected to the 50th floor; concrete is complete to the 41st floor.
When it’s done: Will be 72 stories tall, 977 feet high, and will house the Port Authority’s headquarters.
Space: 2.3 million square feet of office space; 140,000 square feet of retail
Architect: Maki and Associates

5.

5 World Trade Center
• The Port Authority has assumed responsibility for the construction of this tower, but no plans have been released. JPMorgan Chase previously eyed using it as its headquarters, but later abandoned the plan.

6.

WTC Transportation Hub
Date construction began: September 2005
Completion date: 2014
Construction progress: The PATH station is nearing completion; the first of nine pieces of the Vierendeel Truss has been installed; concrete walls have been erected for the Greenwich Street corridor.
When it’s done: It will serve about 250,000 passengers a day, and will have state-of-the-art fare-collection equipment and climate-controlled station platforms.
Space: 800,000 square feet, including 200,000 square feet of retail
Architect: Santiago Calatrava

Performing Arts Center
Date construction began: Below-grade work reportedly started in 2007
Completion date: Undetermined
Construction progress: The project is still in the design phase, and funding is still being worked out.
When it’s done: Will be a 1,000-seat center helmed by the Joyce Theater, hosting dance shows and other events, such as the Tribeca Film Festival.
Architect: Frank Gehry

9/11 Memorial & Museum
Date construction began: Sept. 2, 2008
Construction progress: The memorial, featuring two reflecting pools built over the footprints of the original Twin Towers, will open to 9/11 victims’ family members on Sunday, and will open to the public on Monday. The museum is set to open on the anniversary of the attacks next year.
When it’s done: The memorial will be spread over eight acres, with 400 swamp white oak trees dotting the area. The museum will extend below ground, housing 9/11 artifacts and a wall featuring portraits of the nearly 3,000 victims.
Architect: Michael Arad and landscape architect Peter Walker

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