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Labor deal reached for NYC school administrators

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio holds

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio holds a news conference in the Blue Room at City Hall on Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. Photo Credit: Charles Eckert

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and the city's school administrators announced a tentative contract deal Saturday that the mayor said falls in line with agreements his administration has reached with teachers and other workers over the past year.

The proposed nine-year contract includes yearly raises averaging 2 percent, and would be retroactive to 2010, when the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators' last contract expired, de Blasio said.

The agreement requires approval by the CSA's 6,000 members, who include principals, assistant principals and other administrators.

"It's a good contract, it's a fair contract," the mayor told a crowd of more than 300 union members at the New York Hilton Midtown hotel Saturday. "It means you will get what you deserve for what you're doing."

Ernest Logan, president of the CSA, appeared alongside de Blasio at the event. "The ink is all dry, so this is real," Logan said.

De Blasio said the contract will cost the city $500 million over the next four years, a figure that would be partially offset by $73 million in health care savings.

It calls for an additional $390 million in lump-sum payments to be doled out between 2019 and 2021. The payments are intended to make up for raises most employees received but school administrators missed out on during former Mayor Michael Bloomberg's administration.

Education reforms in the proposed contract include an "ambassador" program that would place successful principals and assistant principals in struggling schools.

De Blasio said that if the contract is ratified, his administration will have successfully negotiated deals with 67 percent of the city's workforce over the past year.

All 152 of the city's labor contracts expired under Bloomberg.

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