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Levi Aron has personality disorder

The Brooklyn man charged with killing and dismembering a small boy is confused and apathetic, has a "practically blank" personality and had a younger sister who died while institutionalized with schizophrenia, a psychiatric evaluation found.

The court-ordered evaluation of Levi Aron, 35, found him fit to stand trial on murder charges in the death of Leiby Kletzky, 8. Details in the report from a psychiatrist and psychologist at Kings County Hospital, obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press, show Aron is deeply troubled.

A psychologist diagnosed him with an adjustment disorder and a personality disorder with schizoid features. "His mood is neutral, practically blank," the psychologist wrote.

The evaluation offers little details on a possible motive and does not delve much into the crime. Aron admitted knowing the charges against him are serious and acknowledged that people are angry with him.

"He states he did not wish the boy harm but 'panicked,' " the psychologist wrote. A major search in Leiby's insular Hasidic community in Borough Park began when he vanished. His picture was plastered on light posts, prompting Aron's panic, court records show, leading him to smother the boy. The medical examiner's office said the boy first was given a cocktail of prescription drugs. But Aron's confession didn't mention that.

Aron has pleaded not guilty to murder and kidnapping in the death of Leiby, who became lost walking home for the first time from a Brooklyn religious day camp July 11.

During the evaluation, Aron gave conflicting accounts of details of his life, including how many siblings he has and whether he sought mental-health care previously. He said he suffered a head injury as a child, but it wasn't clear when. The evaluation was ordered specifically to determine whether he would be fit for trial. Aron's lawyer, Pierre Bazile, said the obtained records were accurate and "we are investigating" whether his disorders would meet the "not guilty by reason of mental disease or mental defect threshold."

A pretrial hearing is set for Oct. 14.

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