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NYPD leadership reshuffling to be announced this week

Chief of Department Carlos Gomez to retire Dec. 21 and filling his post will create the need to fill other vacancies.

Chief of Department Carlos Gomez will retire Dec.

Chief of Department Carlos Gomez will retire Dec. 21, a move that will cause some staff reshuffling. Photo Credit: Charles Eckert

Some high-level changes in NYPD leadership are expected to be announced this week — perhaps as early as Monday — after Chief of Department Carlos Gomez retires Dec. 21, a move that will cause some staff reshuffling.

However, expected developments are subject to last-minute changes because of the NYPD’s often Byzantine politics. For now, department brass thinks chief of patrol Terence Monahan will be tapped by Commissioner James O’Neill to replace Gomez, a Suffolk County native.

NYPD spokesman Stephen Davis said during the weekend that he wouldn’t comment on the selection process or whether Monahan might get the job. But he said the NYPD considered a number of factors in deciding high-level promotions, including command experience and how capable the candidate might be in implementing the department’s strategic initiatives.

Monahan, 56, who lives upstate, joined the NYPD in January 1982 and was promoted to chief of patrol, the second highest uniformed rank, in September 2016. He has been a key person in implementing O’Neill’s neighborhood policing strategy, which the department says is the wave of the future by getting communities to cooperate with local precincts.

One high-ranked NYPD official who didn’t want to be named said Monahan had been a driving force behind O’Neill’s neighborhood policing push that was now operating in 51 of the city’s 77 precincts, making him a prime candidate for chief of department.

Gomez, 55, who joined the department in July 1984, rose in recent years under former Commissioner William Bratton, becoming chief of the housing police in February 2014, chief of patrol in December 2014 and chief of department in September 2016 when O’Neill became commissioner. As chief of department, Gomez’s responsibilities include presiding over weekly department Compstat meetings.

If Monahan is tapped as chief of department, the chief of patrol job, which oversees most of the 22,000 patrol force, could go to Chief Rodney Harrison, now serving in Monahan’s office, said a number of NYPD officials who did not want to be identified. If Harrison were to be promoted, there would be no urgency to fill his old job because one of the chiefs already under Monahan could step up, said one of the officials.

Although Gomez’s departure leaves a void, the NYPD is bracing for an even bigger departure in 2018 when Chief of Detectives Robert Boyce hits the mandatory retirement age of 63 in April. Boyce’s retirement will start another round of musical chairs as the department figures out who will assume command of 6,000 officers doing investigative work.

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