Plaques honoring Gen. Robert E. Lee removed from Brooklyn church

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Two plaques honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that mark a maple tree outside a Brooklyn church were removed Wednesday, the spiritual leader of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island said Tuesday. “I think it is the responsible thing for us to do,” Bishop Lawrence Provenzano said. 

A plaque commemorating Robert E. Lee will be
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

Plaques commemorating Gen. Robert E. Lee were removed Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017. The plaques mark a maple tree originally planted by the Confederate general on the grounds of St. John's Episcopal Church in Brooklyn. The plaques marking the tree was installed in 1912 by the New York chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Lee was stationed at the nearby U.S. Army base at Fort Hamilton from 1842-1847 and reportedly worshipped at the church, as did other army generals based there. 

Plaque commemorating Robert E. Lee were removed Wednesday,
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

Plaques commemorating Robert E. Lee, seen here on Aug. 16, 2017, was removed Wednesday. The plaques mark a maple tree originally planted by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on the grounds of St. John's Episcopal Church, where Lee and other Army generals reportedly worshipped, on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Brooklyn.

Todd Schultz (r.) custodian of Christ Church in
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

Jonathan Ramirez, left, assists Todd Schultz, custodian of Christ Church in Bay Ridge. With them is another worker who did not want to be identified. Plaques commemorating Robert E. Lee will be removed Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017. 

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Plaques after removal. The smaller plaque was installed
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

A look at the plaques commemorating Gen. Robert E. Lee after removal. The smaller plaque was installed later to mark the planting of a new tree by the Daughters of the Revolution after the tree that Lee planted had died. The plaques were removed on Wednesday,  Aug. 16, 2017, from the tree at a Brooklyn church.

Bishop Lawrence Provenzano, Diocese of Long Island and
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

Bishop Lawrence Provenzano, Diocese of Long Island, left, and Khader El-Yateem, the pastor of a Lutheran congregation in the community, speak before the plaque removal. The plaque commemorating Gen. Robert E. Lee was removed on Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, from a maple tree originally planted by the confederate general on the grounds of St. John's Episcopal Church in Brooklyn.

A sign left on the church fence in
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

A sign left on the church fence in front of the plaque which reads "Nazi removed statues in Germany ISIS doing the same!! Yvette Clarke Doing it now." A plaque commemorating Gen. Robert E. Lee was removed Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, from a tree at a Brooklyn church.

After cutting plaques, assistant Jonathan Ramirez carries it
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

After cutting a plaque off a tree, assistant Jonathan Ramirez carries it to a van. The plaque commemorating Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was removed Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, from a maple tree originally planted by the general on the grounds of St. John's Episcopal Church in Brooklyn.

After cutting plaques, Todd Schultz custodian of Christ
(Credit: Corey Sipkin)

After cutting plaques, Todd Schultz, the custodian of Christ Church in Brooklyn, brings them to his van. A plaque commemorating Gen. Robert E. Lee was removed Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, from the church.

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