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The issues: What matters most to New York voters

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NYers wait in line to meet with employers at a job fair. (Getty) Credit: NYers wait in line to meet with employers at a job fair. (Getty)

More than any other issue, the city’s Democratic voters say they want the next mayor to focus on the economy and job creation, while Republican voters say crime and safety needs to be a top priority for Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s successor, according to an amNewYork/News 12 poll.

Below is a breakdown of the issues New Yorkers felt most strongly about in the poll.

JOBS
20% of Democrats and 18% of Republicans said the economy should be the next mayor’s main focus. A mayor focused on jobs was the top choice for black respondents, Brooklynites, Queens residents, men and voters younger than 50. The city’s unemployment rate ticked up to 8.7%, from 7.7% in April, the low point in joblessness for 2013, according to the state Labor Department. Brooklyn and the Bronx have the highest unemployment rates in the state, at 9.6% and 11.9%, respectively.

PUBLIC EDUCATION
While 19% of Democrats said public education should be the top priority for the next mayor, it was the top concern for “very liberal” Democrats, those from labor union households and residents of the Bronx. Critics of Bloomberg’s control of the city’s education system have chafed at his push for charter schools, their co-location in public schools, closure of underperforming schools and how standardized testing is conducted. Recently, student test scores plummeted after more difficult testing standards were introduced to bolster critical thinking skills.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
17% of Democrats — particularly “very liberal” voters, Latinos and Manhattan residents — said affordable housing should be the No. 1 priority. 8% of Republicans, meanwhile, said it’s the top issue. The city is in the midst of a housing crunch, with a 3.1% vacancy rate, according to an April Rent Guidelines Board report. The report also showed a 14.6% increase in the number of people staying in Department of Homeless Services shelters each night between 2011 and 2012.

CRIME AND SAFETY
Meanwhile, 22% of Republicans — the most coming from Manhattan (27%) — want the next mayor to concentrate on crime and safety in the wake of a federal court ruling that found current stop-and-frisk practices to be unconstitutional, according to the poll.

9% of Democrats, meanwhile, said crime and safety should be the next mayor’s
top priority.

 


Scroll down for detailed results from the amNewYork-News 12 poll of the Democratic and Republican primary races for New York City mayor.

The Democratic primary poll, conducted Aug. 22-27, surveyed 600 likely Democratic primary voters via landline and cellphone and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Poll information and graphics:
Democrats
Republicans
Complete survey questions and answers

DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY

Staten Island is not shown because the statistical sampling was too small.

• Penn Schoen Berland (PSB) designed and administered this survey, which was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers August 22-27, 2013. The survey reached a total of 600 registered Democrats in New York City who are likely to vote in the September 2013 Democratic primary. Telephone numbers for the sample were generated from a list of registered voters in New York City and included both landline and cell phones.

• The margin of error for the total sample is +/-4.00 percentage points and larger for the sub-groups.

• The survey is fully representative of likely Democratic primary voters in New York City. To ensure a comprehensive representation of the likely electorate, the data have been slightly weighted by gender, age, and borough.


REPUBLICAN PRIMARY

 

Scroll down for detailed results from the amNewYork-News 12 poll of the Republican primary race for New York City mayor. The poll, conducted Aug. 22-27, surveyed 400 likely Republican primary voters via landline and cellphone and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.9 percentage points.

The Bronx is not shown because the statistical sampling was too small.

• Penn Schoen Berland (PSB) designed and administered this survey, which was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers August 22-27, 2013. The survey reached a total of 600 registered Democrats in New York City who are likely to vote in the September 2013 Democratic primary. Telephone numbers for the sample were generated from a list of registered voters in New York City and included both landline and cell phones.

• The margin of error for the total sample is +/-4.00 percentage points and larger for the sub-groups.

• The survey is fully representative of likely Democratic primary voters in New York City. To ensure a comprehensive representation of the likely electorate, the data have been slightly weighted by gender, age, and borough.

 

COMPLETE SURVEY RESULTS

 


 

amNewYork - News 12 poll, Democratic primary likely voters

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