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Former AG Eric Schneiderman begins collecting $64,000 pension

Schneiderman, who resigned after women he dated accused him of assault, began collecting his $63,948-a-year pension in June, state officials said. 

Former New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman

Former New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman speaks at a news conference in Manhattan on Sept. 6, 2017. Photo Credit: AP / Seth Wenig

ALBANY — Former New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, who resigned after women he dated accused him of assault, has begun to collect his $63,948-a-year pension, state officials confirmed Friday.

Schneiderman, a Democrat, collected his first monthly check in June. He will collect $5,329 per month, according to the state comptroller’s office that supervises pension checks.

Schneiderman resigned after four women accused him in a New Yorker article of physically assaulting them. Schneiderman has denied the allegations.

He resigned hours after the article was posted online and amid the growing  #MeToo movement of women making sexual harassment allegations public.

Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas, whom Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo appointed as a special prosecutor in the case, is investigating the allegations.

The state pension system is now paying out more than $800,000 a year in pensions to elected officials forced from office for corruption convictions and other charges.

More than 30 state officials have been convicted in the last 10 years, mostly in federal prosecutions. 

In a 2017 constitutional referendum, voters approved stripping the pensions of any official convicted of corruption.

A 2011 law allowed judges to revoke or reduce pensions. But it doesn't apply to sitting lawmakers who passed the law and who argued it would be an unconstitutional change in working conditions.

Schneiderman was making $151,084 a year in his second term as attorney general. He began his state political career in 1998 in the state Senate, representing a Manhattan district.

New York state pensions are taxed by the federal government, but not by the state.

Schneiderman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment left with his attorney.

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