TODAY'S PAPER
38° Good Morning
38° Good Morning
NewsWeather

Coastal flood advisories for Long Island shorelines

Cloudy skies, slightly cooler temperatures and a chance

Cloudy skies, slightly cooler temperatures and a chance of rain are in store for Long Island over the next several days, the National Weather Service said Tuesday. Credit: Weather Underground

Coastal flood advisories are in effect for Nassau County's South Shore beaches and back bays Tuesday from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. and for the western Long Island Sound from 10 p.m. Tuesday to 2 a.m. Wednesday, the National Weather Service said.

That means that the combination of onshore winds and tides can lead to flooding of the most vulnerable roads and or basements, the service said.

Minor coastal flooding is expected Tuesday night at high tide for Suffolk's north and south shores, the service said,

In addition, a high rip current risk remains in effect until 9 p.m. Tuesday for Long Island's ocean beaches. The strong currents "and dangerous surf will make the beach hazardous," the weather service said.

Cloudy skies, slightly cooler temperatures and a chance of rain are in store for Long Island over the next several days, the National Weather Service said Tuesday.

Weak high pressure builds over the Northeast region Tuesday, keeping a low-pressure system offshore and generating a window of possible occasional light rain through Wednesday afternoon, the service's Upton office said.

The service said the heaviest of the rain from the system will stay well offshore, but cloudy skies will linger over the area through Friday.

For most of Long Island, the chance for rain Tuesday night through Wednesday morning is around 20 percent.

Thursday night, the probability increases to as high as 60 percent for many parts of Nassau and Suffolk counties, the service said. Rain also could last through Friday morning.

The forecast of clouds and cooler temperatures -- with daily highs in the low to mid 70s -- also includes a chance of further minor coastal flooding coinciding with high-tide cycles, the service said.

More news