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Long Island weather: Clouding up, rain storms, then quite hot

Skies will be sunny, winds will be light

Skies will be sunny, winds will be light and temperatures will be in the mid-70s Tuesday, forecasters said. Credit: Newsday

The end of the week may be set to introduce hot and humid conditions, but Wednesday was looking to bring increasing cloud cover on Long Island, with temperatures rising to the mid-70s or so, forecasters say.

Chances of showers and thunderstorms from a slow-moving system enter the picture overnight Wednesday and through the day Thursday, when temperatures are expected to rise to the upper 70s.

“Unsettled conditions will overspread the entire region Wednesday night into Thursday,” the National Weather Service’s Upton office said in its late Tuesday afternoon regional summary. Also, forecasters said, “temperatures will be warmer, with noticeably higher humidity.”

At this point, “summer heat moves in,” said Rich Hoffman, News 12 Long Island meteorologist.

“The main story Friday to Tuesday will be the very warm to hot weather” for the tri-state area, the weather service said. That’s thanks to “a deep layered ridge” of high pressure building up over the area.

Temperatures for much of Long Island Friday and Saturday were forecast to head up to the high 80s, well above the norm for those days at Long Island MacArthur Airport, which is 80 degrees. Areas of the Island closer to New York City were expected to warm up to 90 degrees or so, with the East End looking at the low to mid 80s.

That can be expected to feel warmer still, when you factor in the humidity, said Joe Pollina, weather service meteorologist.

Look for continuing above-normal conditions into early next week.

The city and areas to the north and west could see “a heat wave beginning Friday and continuing into Monday,” the weather service’s Upton office said Tuesday morning.

A heat wave means three days in a row of temperatures reaching 90 degrees or above.

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