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A South Korean soldier resting near the 38th (Credit: AP)

A South Korean soldier resting near the 38th parallel in his long battle against the inroads of communism into this country. On June 25, North Korean communist troops invaded American-sponsored South Korea in a surprise onslaught. (June 25, 1950)

The Korean War

The Korean War launched June 25, 1950 when North Korean militants began their invasion into South Korean territory and crossed the 38th parallel which served as a border between the two nations. The aggression on both sides caused the war to escalate quickly for years until an armistice was officially signed in 1953.

A wrecked South Korean airplane is displayed from
(Credit: AP)

A wrecked South Korean airplane is displayed from the first Korean War. (July 21, 1950)

South Korean soldiers walk along with full equipment
(Credit: AP)

South Korean soldiers walk along with full equipment as they march north to help repel the Communist invasion during the Korean War. (July 21, 1950)

A South Korean town in the hands of
(Credit: AP)

A South Korean town in the hands of invading North Korean forces burns after being shelled by American artillery. (July 31, 1950)

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North Korean soldiers taken prisoner by South Korean
(Credit: AP)

North Korean soldiers taken prisoner by South Korean forces are questioned upon being brought into a prisoner of war stockade at Taegu, southeast of Yongdong, in South Korea. (July 31, 1950)

South Korean gunners load their 105 mm howitzer
(Credit: AP)

South Korean gunners load their 105 mm howitzer near the front during the Korean War as they fire in support of the First Korean Infantry Division. (Aug. 2, 1950)

Newly organized and equipped Republic of Korea troops
(Credit: AP)

Newly organized and equipped Republic of Korea troops march toward the front lines somewhere in South Korea to take up the battle against the invading North Korean forces. (Aug. 15, 1950)

U.S. Air Force B-29 Superforts are seen on
(Credit: AP)

U.S. Air Force B-29 Superforts are seen on a bombing mission over a chemical plant in Konan, North Korea, during the Korean War. (Aug. 15, 1950)

American troops and some South Koreans are in
(Credit: AP)

American troops and some South Koreans are in a ditch along the road running near the Naktong River in South Korea. Its known as the river road. They are in the ditch for protection against enemy shells. (Sept. 19, 1950)

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Exploding ammunition and port-facilities form a spectacular blast
(Credit: AP)

Exploding ammunition and port-facilities form a spectacular blast cloud at Hungnam, North Korea, after navy demolition crows, last to leave the beachhead, set off charges to keep the Chinese Reds from using the port. Lending barges circle in the foreground. (Dec. 30, 1950)

A Korean War orphan, with no place to
(Credit: AP)

A Korean War orphan, with no place to go, sits among the wreckage of homes near the Korean front lines. The youngster lost both parents during a battle a few days before this shot was taken. (Feb. 16, 1951)

American paratroopers float to earth behind Communist lines
(Credit: AP)

American paratroopers float to earth behind Communist lines in the Munsan area northwest of Seoul, Korea. The sky troopers were joined by an armored column as the Chinese Reds attempted to surround and wipe them out. (March 23, 1951)

Between Inchon and Seoul, on the western scopes
(Credit: AP)

Between Inchon and Seoul, on the western scopes of South Korea, row on row of crosses in a United Nations cemetery marks graves of United States soldiers, sailors and Marines, and of South Korean soldiers, victims of the Korean War. (May 28, 2013)

A napalm bomb dropped from a U.S. Air
(Credit: AP)

A napalm bomb dropped from a U.S. Air Force B-26 burns fiercely after a direct hit on a mine building near Chongdo, North Korea during the Korean War. The U.S. Air Force employed this attack in their program to wipe out basic industrial units in communist-controlled Korea. (June 5, 1951)

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If there was ever any question in the
(Credit: AP)

If there was ever any question in the minds of Marines in Korea of whether to wear helmets or not, there wasn't after seeing this impressive sign posted by some member of the 1st Marine Division. The sign reads: “The wearer of this helmet still ‘lives’ – wear yours.” Medics estimated 19 percent of all casualties are head wounds due to men not wearing helmets. (April 9, 1952)

Troops of the Republic of Korea (ROK) Eighth
(Credit: AP)

Troops of the Republic of Korea (ROK) Eighth Division, wearing camouflaged helmets, wait in a trench on the east central Korean front for a possible attack by Chinese Communists during the Korean War. Allied forces checked the biggest offensive of the Communists since 1951 at Finger Ridge, which was captured June 16 by 6,000 Chinese troops. (June 17, 1953)

A long column of American soldiers winds along
(Credit: AP)

A long column of American soldiers winds along the edge of a mountain road in North Korea as they move forward on the central front. The troops are pushing in the area which they had to abandon earlier in the week when the Communist Chinese hit the lines with a force estimated at nearly 70,000 men. (July 15, 1953)

Maj. Gen. Blackshear M. Bryan, left, exchanges credentials
(Credit: AP)

Maj. Gen. Blackshear M. Bryan, left, exchanges credentials with Communist Lt. Gen. Lee Sang Cho at the opening session of the Military Armistice Commission at the Panmunjom Conference House. At Lee's right is Chinese Gen. Ting Kuo Jo, and next to him is Chinese Gen. Tsai Cheng Wen. (July 27, 1953)

While North Korea and UN guards look on,
(Credit: AP)

While North Korea and UN guards look on, a South Korean soldier, repatriated in the first exchange at Panmunjom, holds up a sign written with blood from his finger. He has just stepped from a communist truck. The sign, written in Korean, reads: “Communists did not defeat South Korea.” (Aug. 4, 1953)

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