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Israel

Soldier lured to his death

A Palestinian lured an Israeli soldier to a village in the West Bank and killed him with the intention of trading the body for his brother jailed for terror attacks, Israel's intelligence agency said yesterday. The slaying casts another shadow on U.S. mediated, Israeli-Palestinian peace talks that restarted this summer. The deaths of several Palestinians in Israeli raids in the West Bank intended to detain militants involved in attacks has also caused tensions, with the Palestinian side canceling one session last month. The soldier, 20, was reported missing Friday and a search led Israeli the troops to Nidal Amar, 42, from the northern West Bank. Amar was arrested and confessed, officials said.

Afghanistan

Afghan kills coalition troops

An Afghan in a security forces uniform turned his weapon against foreign troops yesterday, killing three in eastern Afghanistan, NATO and Afghan officials said, in another apparent attack by a member of the Afghan forces against their international allies. The shooting took place in Gardez, an area near the border with Pakistan that has been a front line in fighting with the Taliban and other militants. The attack took place inside a base of the Afghan army in the city, according to a security official.

Germany

Close election seen today

Chancellor Angela Merkel enjoys overwhelming popularity and leads an economy that's the envy of Europe. But she is in a fight to clinch a new term for her ruling coalition in today's national election, with polls showing her center-right alliance on a knife-edge as her junior partner's support slumps. Merkel and her conservative Christian Democratic Union appear likely to fend off a challenge from center-left rival Peer Steinbrueck and emerge as the biggest party in parliament's lower house, whose members choose the chancellor. But surveys show Merkel's coalition partner, the pro-business Free Democratic Party, has fallen from the nearly 15 percent support in 2009 to about the 5 percent needed to keep any seats in Parliament.

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