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Common Cause maps

In drawing Congressional districts, the Common Cause Reform

In drawing Congressional districts, the Common Cause Reform Map emphasizes regionalization, keeping the state’s different regions together in the same congressional district(s) wherever possible. This is done in recognition of the fact that regions generally have common interests and needs. Photo Credit: Common Cause New York

These reform maps were created by Common Cause New York, a nonpartisan, nonprofit advocacy organization seeking honest, open and accountable government, as well as encouraging citizen participation in democracy. In creating the maps, Common Cause adhered to nonpartisan standards developed two years ago by the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute which are endorsed by the League of Women Voters. Newsday licensed their use in a digital, interactive form.

In drawing Congressional districts, the Common Cause Reform
Photo Credit: Common Cause New York

In drawing Congressional districts, the Common Cause Reform Map emphasizes regionalization, keeping the state’s different regions together in the same congressional district(s) wherever possible. This is done in recognition of the fact that regions generally have common interests and needs.

The Common Cause New York City State Senate
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The Common Cause New York City State Senate Reform Map follows neighborhood and community lines to the maximum extent practicable, while complying with the requirements of the federal Voting Rights Act and the State Constitution.

Generally, the Long Island State Senate districts drawn
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

Generally, the Long Island State Senate districts drawn for the Common Cause Reform Map reflect the demographic distinctions between the North and South Shores and respect town, village and school district boundaries to the extent practicable.

The Common Cause Reform Plan draws New York
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The Common Cause Reform Plan draws New York City’s Assembly districts to better reflect communities of interest, neighborhoods, and changing demographics, keeping neighborhoods within the same district, wherever possible. In order to properly reflect the population of New York City relative to other regions of the state, the Common Cause Reform Map draws 65 Assembly Districts in New York City.

The Common Cause Reform Map for Long Island
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The Common Cause Reform Map for Long Island Assembly Districts endeavors to keep villages and school districts intact wherever practicable. In order to properly reflect the population of Long Island relative to other regions of the state, the Common Cause Reform Map draws 22 Assembly Districts in Long Island.

The Long Island Congressional Reform Districts reflect the
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The Long Island Congressional Reform Districts reflect the demographic distinctions between the North and South Shore, drawing districts which on an east-west axis, rather than a north-south one.

The Congressional districts drawn in New York City
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The Congressional districts drawn in New York City reflect the population shifts within the various boroughs and neighborhoods, while satisfying the requirements of the Voting Rights Act and the State Constitution.

The New York City Congressional Reform Districts reflect
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The New York City Congressional Reform Districts reflect the population shifts and demographic changes within New York City, particularly the increase in the number of Latino and Asian Americans. The districts are drawn to be as close to absolutely equal in size as possible, in furtherance of the principle of “one person one vote” and to comply with the Voting Rights Act and the State Constitutional requirements.

The Common Cause Reform Map for Eastern Long
Photo Credit: Common Cause/NY

The Common Cause Reform Map for Eastern Long Island’s congressional districts reflects the demographic realities of that region by keeping the Eastern part of the Island within one district and are drawn to reflect the distinct demographic characteristics of the Babylon/Islip area.

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