TODAY'S PAPER
Good Evening
Good Evening
OpinionCoronavirus

Good to hear about generosity during tough times

Chucky Morici of Montauk gives away fish he

Chucky Morici of Montauk gives away fish he caught. Credit: James Foley

Newsday is opening this story to all readers so Long Islanders have access to important information about the coronavirus outbreak. All readers can learn the latest news at newsday.com/LiveUpdates.
Your subscription is important because it supports our work covering the coronavirus outbreak and other strong local journalism Newsday provides. You can find the latest news on the coronavirus outbreak at newsday.com/LiveUpdates.

It was wonderful reading about the generosity of Chucky Morici and James Foley, who spent days at sea in a dangerous occupation, then spent days filleting more than 1,000 pounds of fish to donate [“Fishermen’s generosity a net positive for needy,” News, March 27]. Giving it away to needy families was an act from their hearts and restores belief that there is some humanity left in this world. St. Peter, the patron saint of fishermen, is surely blessing them. No applause is loud enough for their humanity. Kudos to Newsday for letting people know.

Arthur French,

Wainscott

I’m sharing my story with fellow Long Islanders who also live paycheck to paycheck and filed for unemployment insurance [“NYers filing jobless claims at 80G,” News, March 27].

I tried at least 75-plus times this past week to file for unemployment benefits as instructed on the website. Finally, I completed the online application, but I was then directed to another website and advised to call the Telephone Claim Center to complete my claim. Since then, I have called at least 80 times with no success. I’m still trying.

I know other people are struggling now to pay bills and wondering when they will get their money or whether they’ll still have a job when all of this is over.

Do not despair. Somehow, things will work out.

Fred Simonsen,

East Northport

I have been abiding by the “stay/work at home” guidelines. Now that I am home during the day, I am astonished by the continuous drone of lawn mowers and leaf blowers in my neighborhood. I am also riding my bicycle solo through many communities on the North Shore and am stunned by the impeccable lawns and shrubs. This is not an essential service.

I am pleased that most will take this time to spring-clean their homes and yards but at considerable risk. The landscaping crews often are three or more workers per truck not abiding by social distancing standards. Frequently, one crew will handle contiguous properties and neighborhoods, increasing risk of transmission.

I am sensitive to the plight of seasonal workers. I plead with my neighbors to sign and honor contracts but please defer landscaping until this crisis subsides. You are putting yourselves and the workers at unnecessary risk.

If we all abide by the rules to wash our hands and stay home then we will hopefully salvage a spring, summer, and fall of backyard barbecues and renewed social gatherings.

John M. Feder,

Muttontown

It is not ideal, but there is learning going on. Our administration was at the forefront, preparing our teachers well for this inconceivable situation. We have had virtual meetings and daily contact with our students. I also want to praise the many publishers, educational services and companies for their generous offers of free materials in my email every day. Even Audible offered free audiobooks to children from “ages 0-18” for free. Some of the wonderful titles are broken down by age and grade level. It is heartwarming. As with 9/11, we need to look for the human spirit that we Americans know exists out there.

Nancy Macri Kennedy,

Huntington Station

No, now is not the time for Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo to be president [“Cuomo is Dems’ best hope for 2020,” Opinion, March 27]. He is not a true leader. The state’s deep financial troubles existed long before the coronavirus and he is going to use this pandemic to take that fiscal pressure off himself. The state’s bail reform law is a disaster, as is his handling of most things, I’d say. Yes, I am a registered Republican, but I will never vote for Cuomo for higher office. I don’t even want him as governor.

Ed O’Connor,

Babylon

Both op-eds on March 27 hit home. As a recovering addict with nearly 30 years clean, I felt Lane Filler’s opinion column [“Sane, sober in the time of COVID-19”] was right on the money about the problem this virus creates for people in 12-step programs, especially if you are just starting. And as a Democrat, I think James Larocca spoke the truth about Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s leadership and President Donald Trump’s lack of it [“Cuomo is Dems’ best hope for 2020”]. Former Vice President Joe Biden is better than Trump, but Cuomo would be better than both.

Paul Permakoff,

Northport

This virus does not attack specific races — this is about all of us [“Hispanics fear virus’ economic impacts,” News, March 29]. It does not matter where it started or who you are, it’s here now and affecting us all. All races are losing jobs, getting sick and losing loved ones. The only difference for people is when you’re in this country legally and you pay taxes, you can collect unemployment and reap the benefits of providing for your family. If you don’t pay taxes, you don’t. We all work hard, but nothing is free.

Debra MacConnell,

Centereach

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Columns