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2020 vote: Biden, Sanders and Trump

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Wilmington,

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Wilmington, Del., on March 12, 2020, and President Donald Trump speaks at the White House in Washington on April 5, 2020 in this combination of file photos. Credit: AP

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I see a lot of sadness, disappointment and anger — even rage — about Sen. Bernie Sanders dropping out of the Democratic presidential race [“Sanders ends his 2020 bid,” News, April 9].

Many ardent Sanders fans say they will never vote for former Vice President Joe Biden and will write in Sanders’ name. But how will that help Sanders? He would be a minority senator with Donald Trump still president, and Sanders would be powerless to move America forward in any of the ways he wants to. It makes more sense to vote for Biden as president and to elect a Democratic majority in the Senate. Sanders could well be a key player in Biden’s cabinet. Or, at least, a senior senator with a majority behind him. Sanders would have no role in a Trump administration. So a vote for Sanders hurts Sanders. With Biden as president, you can bet on Sanders continuing to fight for everything he has been fighting for.

Jody Shepson,

Setauket

I have an interesting proposal for former Vice President Joe Biden. He has stated that he would probably choose a woman as his running mate, but what if he chose former President Barack Obama instead?

There is no restriction on him doing so. In the strict interpretation of the Constitution, the vice president can be a former president. He can succeed to the presidency upon the death, resignation or removal of the president, but he cannot run for a third elected term for president. There is no limit to the number of terms a vice president can hold that office. I think that would, hands down, win the November election for Biden.

Michael Zisner,

Bethpage

Even a person with no more than average intelligence (me) can see that President Donald Trump will trounce former Vice President Joe Biden in the presidential election this fall. A combination of “support” from socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders plus strong support from African Americans will doom any prospect of Biden winning. How is it even remotely possible that the Democratic National Committee does not see this? This saddens me because Trump is perhaps the worst president we’ve ever had.

Can Biden win? Yes, but I am afraid that he won’t do what it takes to win. First, he should distance himself from Sanders. Also, he needs to move at least a few steps to the right to adequately challenge Trump.

Thomas Focone,

Stony Brook

Protect Long Island's marine life

It is time to get serious about fishing in Long Island waters [“Town cracks down on baymen,” Our Towns, April 6]. It seems to me that most marine life, including oysters, clams, crabs and all types of fish, have been depleted on Long Island because of pollution and overfishing. I see virtually no marine life in the Great South Bay. Fifty years ago, the bay was teeming with clams and fish. Now, almost nothing. Even horseshoe crabs are gone.

There should be an end to all harvesting of marine life in the bay. Just as you cannot remove plants and trees from parklands, there should be no removal of marine life from the bay now. This should be followed by a program to restore marine life to the Great South Bay. Maybe, someday, the baymen could return to fishing the way it once was.

Lawrence Donohue,

West Islip

Fighting virus in jail and with more masks

State officials just released data revealing that COVID-19 is taking an enormous toll on people of color [“Racial inequalities shown,” News, April 10]. Yet, days prior, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, with the help of select Senate Democrats, forced through a state budget that would endanger people of color by rolling back bail reform.

Prisons and jails are breeding grounds for the coronavirus. Despite a statewide push to release incarcerated people, in my view the recent bail reform rollbacks enable judges to lock up more people. Rampant discrimination in our criminal justice system, however, means this would disproportionately affect people of color.

It’s terrible policy to put more people behind bars amid a pandemic, especially one disproportionately hurting black and brown communities. Instead, we must release people without delay.

DeAnna Hoskins,

Manhattan

Editor’s note: The writer is president of JLUSA (JustLeadershipUSA), a group addressing the jailed population and that led the #CLOSERikers campaign.

Let's make masks for everyone

It’s great that Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) used his influence with President Donald Trump and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to obtain protective masks for Suffolk County health workers. Now, he needs to use his influence with the president to get him to invoke the Defense Production Act to get factories to make them here [“NY may be nearing plateau, but not on LI,” News, April 6]. Hire the unemployed. Make enough for the entire country. Give or sell them at a reasonable price to Third World countries that cannot afford the price gouging created by the current each-state-for-itself dealing.

It’s a pandemic, worldwide, not just in Suffolk County. The use of The Defense Production Act is long overdue.

Darcy Stevens,

Bellport

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