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OpinionEditorial

Glen Cove eating-disorders home must keep its promises

Like any homeowner in Glen Cove, Monte Nido will have a building permit to abide by

A house on St. Andrews Lane in Glen

A house on St. Andrews Lane in Glen Cove that would become a center to treat eating disorders. Photo Credit: Yeong-Ung Yang

Glen Cove Mayor Timothy Tenke and the City Council have a chance to do what’s right for residents of their city and for all of Long Island. That means not appealing a New York State decision to allow Monte Nido & Associates to buy a house on St. Andrews Lane in Glen Cove and turn it into a much-needed home for adult women suffering from eating disorders.

State Mental Health Commissioner Ann Marie T. Sullivan made the right call when she decided the residence should be allowed because it would not substantially change the neighborhood. It’s very likely that decision would be upheld on appeal. And if Glen Cove officials do appeal, it could cost the city another $50,000 in legal fees on a losing case. That seems like an unnecessary use of city dollars.

Nonetheless, it’s important for the city to recognize that the residents near the home have concerns, from traffic to lighting to their neighborhood’s character. If the city allows the residence to move forward, Monte Nido will have promises to keep, from leaving the home’s brick exterior unchanged and adding landscaping to screen the planned parking lot to improving the land’s drainage and using only residential-style, low-to-the-ground lighting.

Like any homeowner in Glen Cove, Monte Nido will have a building permit to abide by, and it’ll be important for the building department to certify that any work is done properly. Monte Nido representatives say they’ll be good neighbors, ready to address legitimate complaints, and contribute to community events. This is their chance to prove it.

Glen Cove can both look out for its residents and offer a warm welcome to its newest neighbors, too.

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