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Anticipation for solar eclipse

In this Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017 photo, Colton

In this Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017 photo, Colton Hammer tries out his new eclipse glasses he just bought from the Clark Planetarium in Salt Lake City in preparation for the eclipse. (Scott G Winterton/The Deseret News via AP) Photo Credit: AP / Scott G Winterton

Tomorrow, I will be in Greenville, South Carolina, to witness an unusual astronomical phenomena — a solar eclipse [“Solar-powered trip,” News, Aug. 17].

The ancient Greeks believed an eclipse was a sign of angry gods, and that it was the beginning of disasters and destruction. This year, a prediction is circulating that as the sun emerges from the blackness, it will appear to have a bright orange crescent across its upper region. Some will consider this the harbinger of health and prosperity and that it is the greatest celestial event in the 13-billion-year history of the universe. Others will take a dimmer view and think it will cause stormy weather for the next three years.

My hope is that it is not cloudy in Greenville on Monday.

Bill Domjan, Melville

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