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Musings on the presidency of Donald Trump

President Trump in the Rose Garden of the

President Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House on July 25. Photo Credit: The Washington Post / Jabin Botsford

“Pro-impeachment voice on Clinton” [“The 1600,” News, Aug 27] seeks to equate Bill Clinton’s misdeeds with Donald Trump’s.

Clinton was a sexual predator before taking office and continued this behavior by preying on a 22-year-old intern in the White House. He lied about it and sent a message to our youth about what constitutes sexual relations.

Where’s the comparison? As a young lawyer working for independent counsel Ken Starr in the late 1990s, Brett Kavanaugh called it for what it was. This only highlights his moral fortitude to be our next Supreme Court justice.

Georgeanne Drinkwater, Patchogue

The president’s sympathy for and admiration of former campaign chairman Paul Manafort gives us a clear view of his astounding lack of ethics.

This man was convicted by a jury of his peers of failing to pay millions of dollars in taxes. His high-priced lawyers had an opportunity to defend him, but on 18 counts, there was not one of which he was acquitted.

By nonpayment of taxes, he stole from the American people, and the president has no issue with that. The president also shows a lack of respect for our system of justice. It apparently means nothing to him that a jury heard the facts and rendered a decision. This is who is charged with protecting our Constitution. Sad.

Michele Calves, West Islip

So the media decided to speak up with one voice over the issue of the president calling the press “the enemy of the people” [“Our urgent need for truth,” Editorial, Aug. 16]. Is that a conspiracy? When the press of a free society can decide to speak in one voice, then that is the end of freedom. Who is to determine what that one voice is, and who is the authority making such decisions?

Noah J. Polak, Freeport

I have grown so tired of hearing the self-proclaimed “genius” in the White House use the words collusion, witch hunt, fake news, etc. Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and the Democrats are blamed at every turn.

It’s time for President Donald Trump to talk to special counsel Robert Mueller [“The case for Mueller,” Editorial, Aug. 26]. With nothing to hide, there should be no problem. Let’s do it! Trump said he was going to drain the swamp that is Washington. Once his best people are gone, the leftover sludge can finally be cleaned out. Here’s hoping!

Gary Schaefer, Manorville

Michael Cohen says he was directed by Donald Trump to commit a crime for the purpose of influencing the election [“Trump’s ex-lawyer pleads guilty to campaign finance violations,” News, Aug. 22]. That would mean Trump believed the crime was necessary for his victory. Can Congress allow an administration put in place by a crime to continue? Add to that millions of Americans shown fake anti-Hillary Clinton propaganda on Facebook put there by the Russians — possibly in a conspiracy with the Trump campaign.

Impeachment is not the answer; the vice president would be equally illegitimate. Congress must decertify the election, recall President Barack Obama temporarily, and call for a new election. You cannot certify an election born of criminal conspiracies, nor have a president helped into office by his own crimes.

Patrick Flynn,Ridge

I would like to reassure every Republican voter that a Democratic Congress is not likely to impeach Donald Trump. He is the best thing to happen to the Democratic Party since Herbert Hoover, and the Democrats are not likely to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. That means gaining and keeping control of Congress and likely ensuring that a Democrat will be in the White House in 2021.

Most Democrats understand that keeping Trump, with all his bombast, making it up as he goes along, diplomacy by Twitter, and cuddling up to Vladimir Putin, are just the ticket to electoral success. They know that if they impeach their meal ticket, they get Mike Pence, who is much more capable, far less polarizing and a whole lot harder to beat.

Alan R. Lichtenstein, Commack

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