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OpinionLetters

Just Sayin’: A wallet lost on the train — and then returned

Readers weigh in.

Ira Checkla's wallet was returned in the mail

Ira Checkla's wallet was returned in the mail by an anonymous Good Samaritan after he left it on an LIRR train in August 2017. Photo Credit: Ira Checkla

A wallet lost on the train — and then returned!

As I headed downstairs at the Hicksville train station from the 6:53 p.m. train home on a recent Friday, I realized that my wallet was on its way to Ronkonkoma.

I filed a claim with Long Island Rail Road lost and found. The wallet wasn’t returned by Monday or Tuesday.

Arriving home Wednesday evening, I found a brown padded envelope in my mailbox. Inside was my wallet, including my monthly LIRR ticket and New York City subway MetroCard — but no note or return address, only a St. James postmark. I had no way to thank the finder and mailer.

What a way to restore human civility. Thank you to my St. James friend, whoever you are! You have taught us a positive lesson in human behavior when we really need it.

Ira Checkla,Jericho

Keep politics out of state pension fund

As a small-business owner in New York, I don’t have much time to follow politics. I’m focused on ensuring that sales are strong and our employees can put food on their tables.

But a bill introduced in the State Legislature has me concerned not only for the future of my business, but also the state economy as a whole.

Earlier this year, Sen. Liz Krueger (D-Manhattan) submitted the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act. Krueger’s legislation would force the state comptroller to remove all fossil fuel-related investments from the New York pension system.

This legislation is a bad idea for several reasons, principally because it could reduce the value of the New York pension fund, with taxpayers forced to make up the shortfall. Small-business owners in New York have seen enough of politicians prioritizing politics over good economic policy, and the result is nearly always a tax increase for the mom-and-pop companies that are the engine of the state’s economy.

I don’t mind paying my fair share, but I trust that our elected officials will use those tax dollars wisely. Legislation like the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act would breach that trust by forcing the state to make less lucrative investments, leaving taxpayers to foot the bill for political posturing. I encourage the State Legislature to reject this legislation and keep the politics out of public pensions.

Jason Ahlstrand,East Northport

Editor’s note: The writer owns a commercial flooring business.

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