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OpinionLetters

Letter: Carmakers unlikely to go for alcohol interlocks

Pam Simmons holds an interlock device in a

Pam Simmons holds an interlock device in a vehicle at the Alcohol Safety Action Program building in Harrisonburg, Virginia, in 2012. Credit: Pam Simmons holds an interlock device in a vehicle at the Alcohol Safety Action Program building in Harrisonburg, Virginia, in 2012.

While I was taken aback by columnist Lane Filler’s admission that he drove drunk “thousands of times” before he got sober 15 years ago, I do agree that alcohol-interlock devices could save lives [“There’s a way to stop DWI deaths,” Opinion, Oct. 17].

But I doubt the devices are a real solution. The pervasiveness of drunken and impaired driving can be solved only when people change their behaviors and stop putting themselves in situations when drinking and driving are possible. We have ride-hailing services, taxis, buses and trains, friends and designated drivers.

I imagine automakers would never go for the idea of interlock devices in every vehicle because of various factors, from fears of hurting sales to privacy issues and challenges from civil rights groups that might argue the devices inconvenience many based on the actions of a few.

For now, we might have to save interlock devices for convicted drunken drivers who can’t seem to help themselves. For the rest of us, a common-sense approach to drinking and taking responsibility for our actions might be a better prescription.

Alan Krawitz, Bellmore

No county cars for contractors

Nassau County Comptroller Jack Schnirman found that 71 county vehicles were being used by an outside contractor [“Vehicle monitoring audit,” News, Oct. 19].

Giving contract employees taxpayer-owned vehicles to take home and/or use only during work hours risks accidents and lawsuits for the county. Contract employees should use their own or company-owned vehicles.

With the exception of fire and law enforcement officials and others who have to travel at a moment’s notice for essential services, county employees should have their own transportation like everyone else. If an employee must use his or her vehicle for work, he or should be reimbursed for it.

Roy Willis, Massapequa

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