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Letter: Two male survivors of breast cancer

Readers react to topics covered.

The Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk on

The Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk on Oct. 21 at Jones Beach. Photo Credit: Debbie Egan-Chin

We were relieved to read about the good outcome of reader Joseph Danenza’s breast cancer scare [“The scary specter of male breast cancer,” Expressway, Oct 21].

For us it was a different story. We are both breast cancer survivors; one is a six-year survivor and the other a survivor of one year.

In separate situations, we both discovered it ourselves when we each noticed our left nipple was inverted. We each felt around the area and felt a lump, prompting us to see doctors right away.

We went through the same feelings of embarrassment, anxiety and discomfort sitting in waiting rooms with female patients before mammographies and sonograms.

After we each got the horrible news of having breast cancer, we had mastectomies, went through aggressive chemotherapy, radiation treatment, and now hormone treatment to ensure the disease never returns.

Breast cancer for men is a disease that should get more attention. Doctors should check for it routinely. If it is caught early, men often can live long and healthy lives.

We’ve both become volunteers with the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline & Support Program. We are on call at 800-877-8077 for anyone who has concerns about male breast cancer and wishes to speak to one of us about our experience. The Adelphi program also is forming a support group for men with breast cancer.

Vito Vultaggio, Massapequa

Jeff Flynn, East Meadow

A patriotic Halloween

Halloween is always a fun time, watching the neighborhood kids in costume gleefully shout, “Trick or treat!” and take their great rewards of candy.

This year, every youngster (sometimes with a cue from Mom or Dad) respectfully said, “Thank you!”

As a former Air Force officer and a Vietnam-era veteran, I proudly fly our nation’s flag every day. Just as we were ready to close for the evening, another mom came by with two young boys in costumes. As they left with their loot, one shouted, “I really like your flag!” I said, “It’s yours too!” Then the mom said to me and to the children, “No, It’s OUR flag!”

That was my treat for Halloween.

Tobin Rogers, Valley Stream

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