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Letters: Lessons after 9/11

A rose is seen at one of the

A rose is seen at one of the reflecting pools at the World Trade Center in Manhattan before the start of memorial ceremonies on the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks on Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014. Credit: Pool / Andrew Burton

We are a country of immigrants and we must not be prejudiced against those nationalities who may have attacked us. I'm thinking of Germans, Japanese, Iranians, etc. Some of the Islamic State group terrorists are Americans. We cannot and should not target someone for how they look, but rather for their actions. We have friends of all those nationalities. My ancestry includes Germanic heritage.

Writer Rohini Ramanathan's family is Indian. Her heritage is special to her, though different from many in the United States. We can learn from all nationalities, which has truly made us the melting pot.

I remember when I was considering getting engaged in the early 1970s and asked myself, "Should this Catholic boy marry a Jewish girl?" I then rationalized: Forget religion. Is she a good-hearted person? I'm glad I did and as a result we have been married for 38 1/2 years. And we have two wonderful sons and a son-in-law.

J.F. Purcell, Oceanside

 

There are times when we re-examine the meaning of life, and it often takes a tragedy. Sept. 11, 2001, was one of those times.

A new hero rose from the ashes at Ground Zero -- the working class hero embodied and personified as the brave roster of firefighters, police officers and rescue workers. On 9/11, we witnessed acts of great courage.

Essentially, the working class heroes are the saviors of home and humanity, not the idle rich bourgeois or pretentious celebrity.

Show us a tragedy, show us a hero. We shall never forget; 9/11 is forever locked in our memories.

Susan and Robert Davniero, Lindenhurst

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