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OpinionLetters

LETTERS: Carbon bill is vague; Taxes force relocations and more

Carbon bill is vague, hurts businesses

Newsday supports putting a price on carbon as a solution to dealing with climate change, speeding up the development of alternative energy solutions, promoting job creation and curing dandruff .

The editors propose that congressional Democrats will not act because they are too timid and fear "an anti-incumbent tsunami." Well, everyone in Congress should fear an anti-incumbent tsunami. That is why it is called democracy.

As for the cap-and-trade bill, the appeal is vague. At its most basic, it is another tax on business - and since business deals with taxes by raising prices, it is a tax that will be paid by consumers.

In a world where the market for carbon-based fuels is worldwide, if the United States is the only one having this tax, business in this country will be put at another competitive disadvantage.

William A. Lau

Kings Park

Biggest mover: Taxes

The story "It's your move: 7 reasons why people relocate that really hit home" overlooked the most important reason: unconscionable taxes!

On average, leaving this overtaxed, under-maintained island will save $400 monthly. In many low-tax, high-service, safe, well-maintained states, it can be more than $700 in monthly savings. The exodus is well under way.

Jerry LaForgia

Lynbrook

Cameras on every corner? No thanks

In "There's green in those red lights" , Nassau Legis. Judy Jacobs (D-Woodbury) says about the cameras, "I wish we had the ability to put them on more corners."

Jacobs should think for a moment about the world she might be creating: A camera on every Long Island corner that will automatically send you a summons; satellite technology that will do the same each time you go one mile per hour over the speed limit, or the ticket that will pop up automatically from a parking meter when you stay one minute over time.

Sorry, Legis. Jacobs, but I don't want to live in a world like that. Just because our technology continues to advance quickly doesn't mean we should change society.

William H. Frohlich

Wheatley Heights

Rule without influence

I'm sure many readers, like myself, shook their heads in disbelief when they read "No jail for Nassau judge's grandson in 3rd DWI" . How could this happen?

The grandson of a former state Supreme Court justice received five years probation on his third offense.

Our courts need to act without influence and rule justly to make our roads safe and to keep habitual drunk drivers off the road - no matter who they are.

Laura Elling

South Jamesport

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