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Letters: House GOP budget disastrous for poor

House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.,

House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., second from right, accompanied by fellow committee members, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Dec. 7, 2011) Credit: AP

Paule T. Pachter, executive director of Long Island Cares, which fights hunger in Nassau and Suffolk, asks, "Where are the elected officials? I don't think they get what is happening" ["Struggling families on LI are hidden in plain sight," News, June 24].

It's very easy to see where the House Republicans are. Look at Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan's budget: no infrastructure, no relief to towns and cities that want to keep police, firefighters and teachers, no plan to create jobs.

There is help in Washington; it's the People's Budget, put together by the Congressional Progressive Caucus. It would go a long way to undo the damage that America is still suffering from the laughable trickle-down theories forced onto America by the very wealthiest.

Job creators don't create jobs, customers do.

Ann Kemler, Long Beach
 

Fourteen nuns are driving to nine cities that would be hard hit by the budget proposed by Republican Paul Ryan of Wisconsin. The nuns are saying words we haven't heard for a long time: poor, disadvantaged, vulnerable, impoverished. They are doing what few politicians have done for the last 20 years, and that is calling attention to those who have already been suffering and will suffer even more if the House Republican budget is enacted.

These women actually used the word immoral to describe the GOP's latest attempt to maintain the status quo for the rich while the poor get poorer.

Why is this important? Because they are among the only voices shouting for the children, the mothers and the aging. Because they are among the only ones calling for justice.

The real church is on that bus with 14 modern-day prophets raising their voices in the wilderness of an oblivious Congress.

Donna M. Reed, Westbury

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