TODAY'S PAPER
Good Evening
Good Evening
OpinionLetters

Letters: MLK celebration far from inclusive

A tourist points to the exact location where

A tourist points to the exact location where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., gave his famous 'I Have a Dream' speech, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. (Aug. 22, 2013) Credit: AP

Wednesday marked the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech, one of the most celebrated speeches of all time ["Obama on civil rights: Keep on marching," News, Aug. 29].

In that speech, King said he had a dream that one day all people would have equal rights. But I believe that President Barack Obama, Al Sharpton, Attorney General Eric Holder and Jesse Jackson have set race relations back 30 years, because they refuse to talk about certain problems in the black community: the black-on-black murder rate, crime and babies born out of wedlock.

Holder is suing Louisiana in federal court to stop vouchers for the poor, predominantly African-American kids who want to get a better education. The president ended the school voucher program in Washington, D.C., in 2009.

The black community harms itself by voting for or following these men.

Charles Giarraputo, North Patchogue
 

The March on Washington anniversary celebration seemed well-intentioned, but it was spoiled because no conservative blacks spoke. Where were Ben Carson, Condoleezza Rice and Herman Cain? Were they not invited?

It was Ronald Reagan, a Republican, who signed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday into law, yet there was no representation from that party.

The answer is simple: King's message of inclusion has been hijacked.

Martin Kenna, Patchogue

Columns