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Letters: Obamacare repeal idea debated

The Capitol Dome in Washington, DC.

The Capitol Dome in Washington, DC. Credit: Getty Images, 2008

The Sunday morning talk shows were filled with discussions regarding the bill passed by the Republican-controlled House of Representatives that would defund the Affordable Care Act ["Congress at its worst," Editorial, Sept. 20].

Republicans repeatedly stated that they chose this path because Americans overwhelmingly do not support Obamacare and want it repealed. If that were the case, then Mitt Romney would now be president, since he and the Republican Party campaigned on repealing that law.

What Americans want is sensible and responsible government, not these political games that threaten to shut down the government.

Richard T. DeVito, Long Beach
 

So Newsday's editors call those in Congress who want to defund Obamacare "lunatics." What would Newsday call stubbornly going ahead with a law that the majority of the country opposes, is already experiencing implementation problems, will likely cost us full-time jobs, won't do enough to slow health care costs, and will likely morph into another unsustainable entitlement program?

As for the government shutdown, President Barack Obama would like you to panic over this, but the truth is the federal government has been shut down before, and the sky didn't fall in.

That said, if the Senate and president want to avoid that shutdown, Democrats can come to the negotiating table and delay or rework parts of Obamacare, which anyone with a shred of common sense knows is a disastrous law. If they don't, it will be them, and not the "lunatic" Republicans, who are shutting down the government.

Andrew Targovnik, Syosset
 

The Republicans in the House of Representatives have repeatedly tried to find ways to end Obamacare. I can understand that. What I cannot understand is what do they want to replace it with? So far I think the answer is nothing.

What will happen to the millions of poor and unemployed who would be able to buy low-cost medical insurance under Obamacare? What positive proposals do the House Republicans suggest to help Americans without coverage? What will happen to those 26 and older who cannot get a job or coverage due to the effects of the recession?

Under Obama's plan, almost all would receive some coverage so that emergency rooms will not be used by the poor and the unemployed for primary care.

While I believe that there could be a better plan, such as a single-payer system, until that occurs we should stay with Obamacare.

Joseph Marcal, Commack

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