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Letters: Separate languages divide the country

A Peter Max exhibition opens at the Nassau

A Peter Max exhibition opens at the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn on Oct. 25. 2013 and remains on view through Feb. 23, 2014. Pictured is Pter Max Flag with Heart Version XII #218. (2011) Credit: Handout

One of the greatest achievements the world has ever seen was the American experiment: From many, one.

People from all over the world came to be free, to live in this wonderful melting pot, to be a part of the American dream. You don't hear about a Russian dream, a Chinese dream or a Spanish dream.

The very differences that immigrants brought to America were assimilated into our culture, and we had a common language to enable us to communicate with each other, to build and grow. Why on Earth would anyone want to break us up by destroying our ability to understand one another?

If we are to sustain the greatness that is America, we must maintain our common language. English is our language, and the rest of the world needs to know English to do business with us.

My dad came from Europe after World War II, after the rest of his family had been brutally slaughtered. He passionately loved this country. He learned to speak English, and he made sure that we kids would speak it as well. You do no service to English learners by mandating bilingual education ["Bilingual boost: Regents set to require districts to give more help to non-English-speaking students," News, Sept. 16]. You only degrade our wonderful culture.

Larry Mogen, Dix Hills
 

What happened to the patriotism of being an American? When many of our parents and grandparents came to this country, learning English was one of their primary goals in order to earn a living. The adults went to night school, and the children learned English in school, from friends and listening to the radio. There was no free lunch.

Why bother to work harder when things are made so much easier? Why even work when there are so many free choices?

School taxes are constantly rising because more teachers are needed to accommodate the growing population of non-English-speaking students. Next, Regents exams might be given in Spanish as well as English. I hope not.

Are we so manipulated by political agendas and political correctness that we are losing sight of the fact that we have one national language -- English?

Pat King, Merrick
 

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