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OpinionLetters

Letters: U.S. Olympic uniforms and China

This product image released by Ralph Lauren shows

This product image released by Ralph Lauren shows U.S. Olympic athletes modeling the the official Team USA Opening Ceremony Parade Uniform. Credit: AP

Once again, the government has shown that sometimes it has no concept of what goes on in its own house. Newsday's editorial about how upset Congress members are about the Olympic team uniforms being made outside the United States causes me to laugh ["Not made in USA! USA!" July 16]. It reminds me of Sen. Chuck Schumer's concern about outsourcing uniforms for the National Basketball Association.

A couple of years ago, we went to New York City to tour the USS New York. I bought a shirt, a hat and a travel coffee mug. The shirt was made in Sri Lanka, the hat in Cambodia, and the mug, long since broken, I believe was made in China. All were sold on a U.S. Navy ship. Why not start there before telling the private sector what to do?

Bruce Conger, Seaford
 

Good thing the Olympics are not being held in China this year. Our athletes would be totally confused as to which team they are playing for. How can United States of America athletes wear uniforms made in China?

There is an American clothing manufacturing industry eager to create jobs at home for Americans. We give China enough of our business. It is wonderful that Ralph Lauren's company supports our athletes. So how about supporting other Americans as well?

Gloria R. Maffettone, Uniondale
 

The U.S. Olympic Committee has slapped the face of every American who donated to this year's Olympic Games. Buying uniforms made in China!

The committee said it selected Ralph Lauren Corp. because the company "financially supports our team." So do many other Americans.

But like many big-name brands, Polo apparel is manufactured in other countries, depriving American workers of feeding and housing their families. Like Apple Inc., Ralph Lauren supports the workers and economies of foreign countries. Go to a large mall and find the garments with "Made in the USA" on the label, fold them neatly and put them in a sandwich bag.

Sanford Schneider, Island Park

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