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OpinionLetters

LETTERS: Union influence harms NY, roll back taxes, food allergies

Unions' influence harms state's future

New York's growing fiscal crisis, coupled with mounting national and global budget deficits, is unlikely to be resolved any time in the near future. Newsday's editorial "The budget busters" correctly pointed out that only Gov. David A. Paterson is addressing the out-of-control spending.

While neither political party has handled this honestly and fairly, the key reason for little hope down the road is our Assembly leader, Sheldon Silver, who, with his large Democratic majority, will continue in power as a union-dominated uncontrollable big spender. The chances of the Democrats removing Silver from his failed leadership position are minimal to none. Unless we get legislators not controlled by public employee unions, our state's future is hopeless.

Frank J. Russo Jr.

Port Washington

Homeowners could use a rollback, too

According to Nassau County Legislator Robert Troiano, "This should be the year of the tenant" "Board: No rent hike for some," News, June 24]. Troiano and others are advocating a rollback in rents, which have seen annual increases of between 2 and 3.5 percent. Why not advocate a rollback in property taxes, which have seen much higher increases?

Homeowners are the main source of funding for everything from education to making up for the losses to municipal employees' pension funds and their increasing health care costs and raises. Dare we ask for "The year of the homeowner"?

Richard Sweet

Freeport

Food-allergy threat no flight of fancy

I was shocked and disheartened by the letter to the editor belittling the proposed ban on peanuts on commercial air flights .

The writer mockingly asks why dogs are not banned from such flights as she "suffer and wheeze" when in close quarters with one. A reaction to food allergies can be far more serious than the reaction most people have to environmental allergens such as dust, pets or mold. In the most serious cases, a food-allergy sufferer can go into life-threatening anaphylactic shock when exposed to a trigger. Highly sensitive individuals can be set off just by the particles released when a bag containing their trigger food is opened in a confined space.

I don't think asking an airline passenger to go a few hours without his or her peanut fix is too much to ask to ensure a safe environment for all air travelers.

Matthew B. Zeidman

New Hyde Park

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