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OpinionLetters

Newsday letters to the editor for Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017

Newsday readers respond to topics covered.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore at a campaign

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore at a campaign rally, in Fairhope, Ala., on Dec. 5, 2017. Photo Credit: AP / Brynn Anderson

Nassau budget risks grow with ruling

As the former Nassau County assessor, I have first-hand knowledge regarding the development of fair and equitable assessments for commercial properties [“Fines ruled as ‘illegal tax’,” News, Dec. 6]. As a former State Assembly member, I also understand that Nassau County government requires enough revenue to operate in a professional and effective manner.

That being said, as state Supreme Court Justice Anthony Marano astutely pointed out in his ruling, the penalties for not supplying timely information for the Disputed Assessment Fund, initially designed as fines, can be construed as fees used to raise revenue.

Nassau County at this point, must find a more reasonable process to accurately assess Class 4 commercial properties while potentially subsidizing the fund.

Charles O’Shea, Merrick

Editor’s note: The writer is a lawyer whose firm files challenges to Nassau County’s commercial and residential assessments.

Sexual harassment claims move too fast?

I’ve been following the growing list of sexual predators emerging almost daily [“Franken to resign,” News, Dec. 8].

I’m a woman sickened by the graphic stories victims have told. There is no excuse for the men involved. I’ve never seen accusers who are immediately believed, and the heavy hand of justice come down so immediately.

However, I worry about a dishonest individual who is watching the swiftness with which this justice is being meted out. Who is to say that an actor who has an ax to grind — perhaps regarding a part denied or dislike of some sort of treatment — may see a way in which to exact revenge? What better way to do that than in this climate, and say #MeToo.

Don’t misunderstand, I’m very glad that many of those accused are admitting their heinous acts of sexual misconduct, but this can be a slippery slope. We are getting into the area of guilty until proven innocent.

Terry Sherwood, Farmingville

GOP support for Moore’s indefensible

Political games have reached a new low [“Trump ramps up support for Moore,” News, Dec. 9].

I know this because Republicans, the “family values” party, would rather elect an alleged child molester as a U.S. senator over a Democrat. Alabama should be ashamed, but probably isn’t.

Owen Sargent, Huntington

Christian values are being marginalized

I read the story about the U.S. Supreme Court case concerning a Christian baker who did not want to make a wedding cake for two gay men [“How will key justice slice it?” News, Dec. 6].

This baker has been hounded and fined almost out of business by authorities and the publicity. He now refuses to make any wedding cakes, which was 40 percent of his business, as a result.

This gay couple could have easily said they would never do business with him again and taken their business elsewhere, but they chose to make this a national issue by their actions.

I wonder whether this couple would do the same thing to a Muslim baker or an Orthodox Jewish baker whose religion prohibited same-sex marriage. Christians are once again being marginalized.

Nicholas Dallis, Smithtown

Trump defames Clinton with lies

President Donald Trump said it out loud in front of cameras and microphones: “Hillary Clinton lied many times to the FBI. Nothing happened to her.” [“Trump: Flynn treatment ‘unfair’,” News, Dec. 5]

Isn’t it time that he be held accountable for saying reckless, irresponsible falsehoods? Clinton was never charged, tried or convicted of lying to the FBI. Trump claiming so is defamation.

James Brennan, Rocky Point

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