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OpinionLetters

Newsday letters to the editor for Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Newsday readers respond to topics covered.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton with faculty

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton with faculty members as she's introduced before she delivers the commencement address at Wellesley College, Friday, May 26, 2017, in Wellesley, Mass. Clinton graduated from the school in 1969. Credit: AP / Josh Reynolds

One way to find recycling scofflaws

“Maybe fines would encourage recycling” [Letters, May 28] made an excellent suggestion about to how to increase recycling in Brookhaven.

I would take a slightly different approach in finding out which homes are not recycling. Have a person, maybe a teenager looking for a summer job, ride with the truck that picks up recycled items. This person could record the addresses of those homes that don’t put out anything for recycling.

When a given address has not put out anything for recycling for two or three pickup days in a row, then those addresses should have their regular trash checked for recyclable items. Fines would be in order when recyclable items are found.

My approach should be adopted by all of the towns on Long Island.

William J. Van Sickle, Brentwood

Where’s the evidence of Russia collusion?

Since the election, we have been inundated with press reports of President Donald Trump’s alleged collusion with Russia, yet there is zero concrete evidence [“Trump defends son-in-law,” News, May 31].

The press, the Democrats and many Republicans have become obsessed with taking down our duly elected president.

It’s time to stop. It’s severely hurting our country. Partisan, obstructionist politics prevent any true resolution of issues and policy.

People leaking information should be exposed and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law, including facing a firing squad.

David Sellar, Northport

Unity should be priority of both sides

I loved Hillary Clinton’s articulate remarks at the Wellesley College graduation [“Clinton spurs grads, takes aim at ex-foe,” News, May 27].

She talked about disenfranchised Americans, but I think she should have added, “Those of you who find yourselves drawn to the approach to government epitomized by the president, I have a message for you. You are not deplorable. And anyone who calls you so, is wrong. You deserve to be listened to and cared for. Let’s find common ground and work together to build our country.”

There are too many supporters of President Donald Trump for Democrats to dismiss or to simply fight. A more inclusive strategy could help the Democrats. Republicans are making the same mistake that Democrats have made in the past. That is, writing off certain groups.

Both parties should make unity of Americans a priority.

Tedd Levy, Bellmore

Topics for a state constitutional parley

Your editorial about the prospect of a state constitutional convention didn’t go far enough [“Why we might do the con-con,” May 30]. There a million other things due for reform. Among them:

  • Abolish one house of the legislature (Nebraska does fine with just a state senate).
  • Prohibit outside employment if legislators are full time.
  • End party cross-endorsements and all judicial elections.
  • Enable easy absentee voting, early voting and same-day enrollment.
  • Require officials elected on a party line to caucus with that party or change enrollment.
  • Consider overhaul of the property tax assessment process, which hurts Long Islanders.
  • Revise laws that have encouraged proliferation of authorities and special districts.
  • End the state comptroller’s sole control of state pension assets.

Reform is long overdue. We are already deep into the 21st century. Make sure the best possible people are elected to this convention and keep this the Empire State.

David Zielenziger, Great Neck

Children are grown, but he’s still paying

Now that the last of my three children has graduated college, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s free tuition program for the State University of New York and City University of New York public systems is taking effect [“Cuomo’s evolution ahead of 2020,” Opinion, April 16].

I now pay more than $6,000 a year in school taxes for “free” public school education, which my family no longer uses.

Raymond P. Moran, Massapequa Park

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