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OpinionLetters

Newsday letters to the editor Thursday, May 18, 2017

LIRR commuters they rally against the unprecedented delays

LIRR commuters they rally against the unprecedented delays and cancellations riders faced recently, and to demand Amtrak relinquish control of Penn Station on Saturday, May 13, 2017, in Rockville Centre. Photo Credit: Howard Schnapp

Unhappy with health care options

The “Affordable” Care Act doesn’t exist, period [“McConnell: Women will have say on health bill,” News, May 10].

For the plan I found at the New York State health exchange, premiums went from $301 to $400 a month for a single person. I’m older than 60 but not yet 65 and eligible for Medicare. I see a doctor maybe twice a year and take basic medications. I’m self-employed, and my income is declining.

I have to decide whether to pay my federal income taxes or health care premiums and a high deductible. I can’t do both. I reached out to Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand but got no response.

Trumpcare, whatever it becomes, couldn’t be worse than what I’ve got now.

James Forbin, Westhampton Beach

 

Democrats and Republicans need to stop using the terms affordable health care or cheaper health care. There is no way to make health care cheaper using for-profit insurance companies and expect to get the same high-quality care for all.

Why can’t we use the two health care plans our nation has right now and just expand Medicaid and Medicare? Lower the age for Medicare to 55, and have sliding-scale premiums based on income. Everyone else could go into Medicaid.

Leave health care decisions to health care professionals and their patients. We all like saving money by being more efficient and cutting waste, but Washington shouldn’t cut costs at the expense of life or allow insurance companies to deny procedures.

Both parties are playing games with our health and our lives, and it needs to stop.

Patrick Nicolosi, Elmont

Ineffective walls litter human history

President Donald Trump should read a little history before he wastes billions of dollars on a Mexican border wall [“City protesters greet president,” News, May 5]. He should check out Hadrian’s Wall, the Berlin Wall, the Maginot line and Genghis Khan.

The Berlin Wall was little more than 90 miles long. More than 5,000 East Germans are estimated to have gone over, under or through it, and it had land mines and many soldiers on guard.

The Great Wall of China is 5,500 miles long and was built, in part, to keep out the Mongols. It failed to hold back Genghis Khan.

Owen Sargent, Huntington

Long Island Rail Road, how about refunds?

Not once have I heard or read of the Long Island Rail Road offering refunds on all monthly and daily tickets [“ ‘So bad it’s unbearable,’ ” News, May 11].

In my opinion, such multiple daily failures require compensation. When I order a package, and it doesn’t arrive, I request a full refund. That’s only fair.

Maybe late fees should also be paid to each ticketholder as additional compensation for the LIRR’s very poor performance.

Mark Redlus, Cedarhurst

Gun reciprocity works for law enforcement

Referring to “Public needs more on Zeldin gun views” [“Letters, May 8], the writer needs to look no farther with regard to the dangers presented by the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act proposed by Rep. Lee Zeldin. In a more exclusive form, it already exists, with no associated danger. The federal Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act provides for interstate concealed-carry reciprocity for law enforcement officers and law enforcement retirees.

While New York sets exceedingly high standards for its law enforcement officers, many other states and localities find such standards difficult to maintain, expensive to administer and generally unnecessary.

It’s extremely rare to hear of an incident in which a law enforcement officer or retiree has compromised the safety of folks in a different state. In reality, the only people we need to worry about with regard to concealed weapons are criminals. A duly licensed, law-abiding citizen of any state is simply not looking to go into someone else’s state and create a dangerous situation.

Vincent Cristiano, Ronkonkoma

Editor’s note: The author is a member of the Nation Rifle Association and the administrator of the NYS Concealed Carry Advocacy Group.

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