TODAY'S PAPER
Clear 44° Good Morning
Clear 44° Good Morning
OpinionLetters

Newsday letters to the editor Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Emmy Specht of Four Girls For Families, center

Emmy Specht of Four Girls For Families, center left, with children in the Sret Village in Cambodia in March 2017. Specht, of Bellport, her sister, and two friends have raised $280,000 to build one school and provide clean water for thousands of rural villagers in Cambodia. Photo Credit: Four Girls For Families

Get priorities right in Hempstead

Why does Hempstead Town Supervisor Anthony Santino need three executive assistants, all of whom earn such inflated salaries [“Town employs village officials,” News, April 10]?

Eliminate two of the positions, and use their salaries to repair neighborhood roads that are in deplorable condition. Our tax money is surely being misused.

Lynn Burke, Seaford

End overbooking by our airlines

Why is overbooking by airlines acceptable [“Roughed-up doctor plans to sue United,” News, April 14]?

Computers can easily calculate how many seats are on a plane and how many people can be accommodated, including staff.

If there are occasional no-shows, there are usually travelers standing by to fill the seats.

Bumping people from flights should not be permitted.

Aurora Forte, Smithtown

What indeed are American values?

A recent letter writer argued that we should admit only immigrants who “believe in our values” [“Admit immigrants who share U.S. values,” April 5].

Is she referring to the values that drove us to genocide and quarantine of American Indians? Or perhaps the values that were responsible for slavery and segregation?

Maybe she means those who accepted the roundups and internments of Japanese-Americans during World War II?

Could it be the continuing bigotry, xenophobia and jingoism that so many of our native-born citizens embrace? How about our comfort with perpetual war against others and our indifference to the poverty, discrimination, abuse and illness of our own citizens?

She implies that immigrants don’t want to work, when they tend to be our hardest workers and, ironically, are unfairly blamed for taking American jobs.

The writer ends with the imperative to respect the police, while unarmed black youth, in particular, are being shot and killed by police each year. America could learn a few things about values from the rest of the world if we let immigrants in.

Alan M. Weber, Medford

Young women have touched many lives

I was so moved by the efforts of the young women who founded the organization Four Girls for Families [“Teens make well wishes come true in Cambodia,” News, April 9].

Those girls will probably never know how many lives they’ve changed for the better by providing the basics of clean water and a school. Thank you for highlighting their work.

Janet Prete, Bellmore

Party-line politics has failed Americans

I am compelled to put on paper what I feel and hear in my world of family and work [“President’s plan to make the rich richer,” Letters, April 2].

People I speak with are focused on issues that directly affect them, their families, their communities and their futures. We want to know about our financial security, jobs with livable wages, affordable health care, Social Security and retirements. We bleed through taxes and are disappointed with underrepresentation by elected officials. Everything else is mostly noise and distraction.

Party-line politics has failed American citizens, and the proof is our struggle to make ends meet. Most households have two incomes, and that still isn’t enough. It’s not getting easier, it’s getting harder.

We demand nonpartisan politics and decision-making based on what will help hardworking people. The halls of Congress must address the kitchen-table economics of the people.

Chuck Schalk,Oceanside

Why not let Syrians find safety in U.S.?

The president described “a chemical attack that was so horrific in Syria against innocent people, including women, small children and even beautiful little babies, their deaths were an affront to humanity” [“Trump turns on Assad,” News, April 6]. He said this attack had a “big impact” on him and he responded with strong and swift military action.

Will the big impact of this incident also alter his position on preventing other “innocent people, including women, small children and even beautiful little babies” in Syria from entering the United States so they can avoid violence that essentially condemns many of them to similar horrific deaths?

Mark A. Nocero, Smithtown

Columns