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Learning from the Capitol siege

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to National Guard

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to National Guard troops outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Thursday Credit: AP/Alex Brandon

While I do appreciate some readers’ and politicians’ frustration on a double standard of the media’s response to the Black Lives Matter summer riots and the Capitol siege, to me, they couldn’t be more different. I do deplore both — violence is never acceptable. The BLM protests are pent-up responses to hundreds of years of social injustice starting from when the first enslaved Black man came upon these shores. The Capitol siege is the result of one man’s unproven (delusional) belief in voter fraud. The Capitol attackers marched from President Donald Trump’s rally to the Capitol, and the intent appears clear to me.

Jim Baumert,

West Islip

Congress’ decision to resume certifying the election results on Jan. 6 will go down as one of the greatest events in U.S. history. The members should take pride in their determination, courage and bravery for continuing to complete the process started earlier in the day despite the Capitol siege. They dusted themselves off and faced the public and the cameras as if nothing had happened. A fabulous display of resolve. I hope when the smoke clears after Jan. 20, our nation honors them for this act of dedication. Americans owe them a debt of gratitude for preserving democracy in the face of grave danger. History will show their actions will make headlines in history books and that future generations will learn and know about the importance of preserving democracy.

Robert Gelenter,

Plainview

Although I did not vote for President Donald Trump, I must give him credit for the good he did educating Americans. It is because of Trump that more Americans became more involved in this country. Because of Trump, voting changes came about and more people voted. Trusted friends and family members were revealed as racist, anti-Semitic and homophobic. But more important, Trump has shined a light on what needs to be changed in our Constitution and our government. That’s because, unfortunately, we and the world realize that we are just as vulnerable to anarchy and autocracy as any Third World country, and our freedoms are at risk. And, inevitably, there will be another Trump in America’s future.

Ethell Smith,

Freeport

It has become extremely worrisome that roughly half the country is being censored, silenced and muted by the Big Tech companies. Fascism is partially defined as forcefully suppressing opposition and criticism. These monstrous conglomerates are practicing the very thing they are accusing President Donald Trump of employing. Are there any Democrats willing to condemn this repressive assault and support every American’s right to free speech? If the access to liberal media and websites were censored, silenced, banned and blacked out, would the Democratic Party accept it? I believe that in the America that I know, both sides have the right to voice their political opinions openly, without fear of repression or censorship. Do any Democrats believe this?

John Ruddy,

Nesconset

Evidently, President Donald Trump believes his love affair with and incitement of part of his "base," an ultra-right wing amalgam of conspiracy theorists, racists and other like-minded extremists, helped his political life. Perhaps. But will this group spend money at his golf resorts and hotels, or buy his family’s branded clothing? Not from the group I saw at the Capitol on Jan. 6. Hopefully, the more traditional conservative Republicans that I remember from my youth, the upper middle class and wealthy who crave the good life, will understand that Trump’s other base is a threat to their comfortable life. I suggest golf somewhere else and don’t patronize Trump resorts or buy Ivanka Trump’s overpriced line of informal wear. Dry up the money spigots. That should hit the president where it hurts.

Marty Lieberman,

Hauppauge

President Richard Nixon proposed having one six-year term of office for the president. The amount of time and money involved in a second-term campaign would be eliminated. The recent craziness that happened as a result of a second-term campaign would have not happened. I suggest we contact our politicians and tell them this idea is good common sense.

Sue Marcote,

Point Lookout

What happened on Jan. 6 at the Capitol was deplorable and, to me, so is the left’s impeachment of the president. Didn’t President Donald Trump say in his Jan. 6 speech, "I know that everyone here will soon be marching over to the Capitol Building to peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard today"? How come no media outlets focus on this? I don’t consider this an act of insurrection and believe the Democrats are beating the same dead horse they have been beating since his election.

Wayne Mortak,

West Babylon

I beg Republicans in the House (except for the 10 brave people of integrity) and Senate and conservative TV anchors and radio hosts to stop spreading the lie about the election being fraudulent. To unify the country, I believe every person in the media and in Congress must speak the truth and not perpetuate the lie started by this president. He lost the most secure election in history, period. There has been no evidence of massive fraud, period. For those on Fox News or Newsmax to continue to say this is what is dividing the country — stop! All those in Congress who keep spewing these lies must stop or resign. They can no longer remain in our sacred chambers while enabling this lie to continue and stoking the violence of people who they have succeeded in getting to believe them. What they should feel is shame for how close they came to a successful coup. President Donald Trump will never change — but they had better or please get out of politics for the safety and good of a country needing healing.

Jo-Tina DiGennaro,

Bayville

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