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Sandler? Gregory Peck waited on line

Adam Sandler at the 25th Annual Critics' Choice

Adam Sandler at the 25th Annual Critics' Choice Awards. Credit: Getty Images/Frazer Harrison

With all the trouble going on in the world, why all the fuss about actor Adam Sandler not getting special treatment at the IHOP? ["Sandler pays new visit to LI IHOP for good cause," flash!, May 12]

When I was a young woman in the ’70s, I was waiting on a long line to get into a popular movie. Also on line was Gregory Peck — a big star at the time — and his young daughter. He waited patiently in line like everyone else and didn’t ask for special treatment. New Yorkers, being the cosmopolitan people they are, left him alone.

Connie Leo, Massapequa

GOP will rise again out from the ashes

For many years, I’ve witnessed the Democratic Party, liberals and progressives attack the Republican Party as being antiquated, racist, sexist, homophobic, cruel, zealots, bigots and misogynists. Now that I see the Democrats seizing control of our public school systems, their attacks are increasing.

No, the Republican Party is not dying; it is being reborn ["Cheney loses top post," News, May 13]. Birth is not pretty. It is painful and messy. But like nature, it is necessary for life to progress and flourish.

I look forward to the 2022 national election. The Republican phoenix will once again rise from the ashes.

Our country must have a vibrant two-party system, one liberal and one conservative. Think of it as yin and yang.

Paul H. Schmutz, Nesconset

How do Republicans such as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy reconcile their actions? Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) tells the truth about our truly honest democratic 2020 election and the hideous Jan. 6 insurrection. Sadly, this Voltaire quote applies today: "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities."

Elinor Henick, Long Beach

Too much emphasis on standard tests

I am a retired New York City elementary school teacher and teacher trainer. After retirement, I returned every year to proctor English Language Arts and standardized math tests to students. Far too much emphasis has been placed on these tests "More than half opt out of tests," News, May 11].

Teaching test strategies and administering practice tests have robbed students of weeks of authentic learning. Teachers are on such a tight schedule, teachable moments are gone and forgotten. Basing teacher performance on test results was absurd. It dismisses the conditions under which a student is taking the test on a particular day. Some students test well, but some become anxious and freeze. I’ve seen it all.

By April and May, teachers have administered so many online assessments that they are fully aware of students’ strengths and weaknesses.

The money spent on the tests, to me, is wasteful and can be used more wisely for hiring more teachers. The grading is often arbitrary. Rewarding schools with federal money based on testing should be a thing of the past.

The old No Child Left Behind concept should be left behind.

Gail Cener, Rockville Centre

Better ways to cure gun violence

As I read Newsday reporting on the out-of-control violence in New York City, I was not surprised to hear Sen. Chuck Schumer’s cure ["Trauma for Times Square victim," News, May 10]. He proposed stopping gun sales at yard sales and offered other gun control ideas that have been talked about for many years.

I believe he did not address the real causes, including the ridiculous state laws enacted concerning bail reform, which releases often violent criminals back into the streets before the police officer leaves the courthouse. He also failed to mention New York City laws that have made our couragous officers take a step back before enforcing laws, fearing they will lose their livelihood if they are forced to fight with a violent person who resists arrest.

Sadly, New York City will continue to see more violence and loss of tourism and jobs unless our politicians wake up and address the real problems and change the current laws and start supporting law enforcement officers who risk their lives every day that they go to work.

Stephen Nasta, Great Neck

Editor’s note: The writer is a retired NYPD police commander.

While I agree with the never-ending calls for additional gun control, I wonder why we don’t hear about the same number of calls for additional justice and penalties for criminals who commit these crimes.

It seems politicians and other concerned citizens are focused on only one subject, gun control. Where are the cries for our justice system to enforce and perhaps toughen laws? While we cry for gun control, the court system has a revolving-door policy on those who commit crimes with guns.

We seem to ask for control of one system, while we totally ignore another broken system that may have just as much responsibility.

Jerry Reilly, Lindenhurst

Columns