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It's not 'prejudice' against anti-vaxxers

Choosing to forgo the vaccine is a choice

Choosing to forgo the vaccine is a choice which puts other humans and the world at risk, some readers argue. Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto/Fernando Rodriguez Novoa

It’s not ‘prejudice’ against anti-vaxxers

A reader complains of "prejudice" against the unvaccinated ["Vaccine is real shot in the arm," Letters, Aug. 3]. Many fully vaccinated citizens beg to differ with his characterization of the once-again expanding COVID-19 rules. Prejudice would be applying strict COVID standards to folks because of their skin color, religion or sexual orientation, not vaccination status.

Sadly, too many Americans have decided to be part of the problem rather than part of the solution and thus have forced these measures to be implemented. You don’t want to be denied service by a business? You don’t want to wear a mask and submit to weekly COVID testing? Then get vaccinated.

If every American had put the common good ahead of one’s individual "rights" from the beginning, we would be in a better place than we are now. Those who have done so are out of patience with those who have not, and it’s time for the unvaccinated to take responsibility for their actions and deal with the consequences.

— Maryellen Viola, Massapequa Park

The reader who wrote a letter stating that "while the world is trying to stop prejudice, we are starting a new one — against people who aren’t vaccinated" is making a terrible false equivalency.

The world is bringing attention to and trying to stop discrimination and hateful acts against people who are members of oppressed groups due to their race, sex, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender identity. These are not choices; people are born into these groups. And their membership in these groups does not negatively impact the lives of others in any way.

Choosing to forgo the vaccine, on the other hand, is a choice which puts other humans and the world at risk. It is a selfish choice, often based on lies and misinformation. The reader could not be more wrong.

— Alyson Lewis, Locust Valley

The writer is a licensed clinical social worker.

Many vaccinated readers are trying to punish and shame unvaccinated people. Why are they so angry? If you have the vaccine you likely will not get very sick or be hospitalized or die.

Stop trying to punish your neighbor and just take care of yourself and your family.

— Tom Dougherty, Huntington Station

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