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OpinionLetters

Gabby Petito case and Garden City's dispute with the LIRR

Laundrie would not have vanished here

If Brian Laundrie still resided in Suffolk County, I am confident his residence would’ve been under constant surveillance ["Dive team joins search," News, Sept. 23].

The North Port Police Department’s apparent excuse of a lack of manpower is weak. I hope that all jurisdictions involved don’t get tunnel vision regarding the preserve. It may just be a convenient diversion in an attempt to get law enforcement to believe he died there with no trace of his body because of native wildlife.

— Mark Piotrowski, Wading River

MTA gets a free publicity ride

Last year, Newsday decried Garden City residents and politicians for protesting the installation of monster 120-foot steel utility poles and dense wires over homes and parks. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s initial plans were to "relocate PSEG electric transmission, LIRR signal and communications, Verizon, and [Altice] lines from south to north of LIRR [right-of-way]."

However, MTA documents show it exempted its contractor, 3TC, from honoring the MTA’s original plan to move or bury utility lines because doing so would be "difficult" and "time consuming."

Now, Newsday echoes MTA drivel that the village refused to discuss issuing permits on the Tanners Pond Bridge replacement project, hyperbolically extrapolating impacts on multiple MTA projects ["Keep LIRR’s projects on track," Editorial, Sept. 19]. Previously, a 3TC representative affirmed that Garden City approvals are necessary for "anything project related affecting your area before it is implemented which is 100% a fact and should be followed at all times."

Garden City proposed assuming remediation efforts with upfront MTA funds, already contractually committed at the back-end and currently available in reserve funds. Rather than taking a consultative path forward or dedicating time to bury/move utility lines and poles as originally specified, the MTA opted to sue instead.

— James Kumpel, Garden City

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