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Move on Soleimani not like bin Laden

Protesters chant slogans while holding up posters of

Protesters chant slogans while holding up posters of Gen. Qassem Soleimani during a demonstration in front of the British Embassy in Tehran, Iran on Jan. 12, 2020. Credit: AP/Ebrahim Noroozi

I was astounded by a reader who equated the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani to the killing of Osama bin Laden as deserving the same presidential accolades [“Of impeachment and Soleimani,” Letters, Jan.22].

Bin Laden was the world’s most-wanted terrorist and the mastermind behind the horrific attacks on 9/11. He was the subject of nearly a decadelong international manhunt. I accept that Soleimani was an evil man. However, President Donald Trump could not provide solid evidence that terrorist attacks were being planned by Soleimani or that there was imminent danger. At one point, Trump said that “[Soleimani] was planning something.”

Trump’s order to kill Soleimani was seen by many as a poor decision. President Barack Obama was not looking for accolades. He did monitor the raid that killed bin Laden and announced bin Laden’s death during a televised address from the White House. I am sure there were cheers but probably also tears in remembrance of those who died on that fateful day in 2001.

Carol Krupinski,

Plainview

Massapequa Park offers dining variety

George Korten, owner of the George Martin Restaurant Group, states that Bar Agave’s upscale menu and cocktail program were “not a good fit for the location” [“Upscale bar Agave closes after 3 months,” feedme, Jan. 9]

I am not sure if by location he meant the Village of Massapequa Park or the Southgate Shopping Center. But if he’s referring to the village, I take that as a slap on the face. Residents of the Massapequas support a variety of dining venues from casual options to fine dining.

If he is referring to Southgate, then he should know about Zim Zari, a Tex-Mex-based restaurant just a few stores away in the same shopping center; and Don Juan, a Mexican restaurant across the street that has been there for more than 25 years.

Daphne Mullaly,

Massapequa

Some civility needed by LIRR passengers

Regarding Long Island Rail Road riders who are seat hogs [“Deep-seated choices,” News, Jan. 5], perhaps the speaker system on the trains could automatically announce before they leave Penn Station or Flatbush Avenue: “If you have a bag on the seat next to you and passengers are standing in your car, would you please place the bag in the rack above you and let a fellow passenger sit down. Thank you.”

Kenneth Buxbaum,

St. James

Traumatic injuries to the brain are serious

It truly baffles me that people still support President Donald Trump. It seems every day there is a quote by him that is demoralizing. The latest is his response to the traumatic brain injuries suffered by 34 soldiers after the Iranian air strike. Trump said that it was “not very serious.” I think that most us of are aware how serious traumatic brain injuries are.

I would have been happy to support this president and give him a chance, but right out of the box his deceptions made that impossible for me.

Diane McGuire,

Northport

 

Will Ocasio-Cortez put money by her words?

Much has been written about the upcoming presidential election. In a different election bid, according to her reelection campaign, in her first year in Congress, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is expected to report millions of cash donations on hand. She happily took that money from the working class to increase her campaign wealth to better her chances to win reelection. In this case, wealth is good. In contradiction, according to her, it would be fair to redistribute wealth to balance economic power by making democracy more like a workplace cooperative. Since Ocasio-Cortez is an admitted Democratic socialist who believes wealth represents greed and disparity is social class power, I hope she stays true to her ideals and donates 70% to the less fortunate candidates to balance the power of the election process.

Pete Scott,

Nissequogue

Political crossfire isn’t good for America

Americans do not have a government. Instead we are ruled by a gang war: It’s the Red vs. the Blue, with the public caught in the crossfire. Many politicians don’t care about us or our country, and they just perpetuate their own careers. Our future is bleak.

Gary Bravstein,

Searingtown

Advice columnist seen as fairer

I just wanted to point out that as I’ve been reading both Dear Amy (Dickinson) and Carolyn Hax columns, I must say I’m much more impressed with how Hax responds to readers’ issues. I find her responses more evenhanded and to the point.

Dory Anne DeMille,

Malverne

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