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Letter: Two views of the U.S., the Kurds and Syria

A Syrian government soldier flashes the victory gesture

A Syrian government soldier flashes the victory gesture as he holds up a portrait of President Bashar al-Assad as he stands next to a flying Syrian national flag and Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) yellow flag, atop an electrical pole by the Turkish border in the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, in the north of Aleppo governorate on Friday. Credit: AFP via Getty Images/-

It was a breath of fresh air to read columnist Lane Filler throw a little bone to Donald Trump, the embattled president [Opinion, Oct. 16].

Many Democrats typically vilify Republican presidents as warmongers. But wait, here is a Republican president who promised to put an end to endless wars in the Middle East and is following through with his promise to remove U.S. troops, yet he gets criticized by Democrats. If this does not tell you how hypocritical these Democrats are I do not know what will.

The Kurds helped us successfully fight the Islamic State. That fight was mostly over, so it’s time to bring U.S. troops home.

David Duchatellier, Elmont

In September 1938, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain agreed to permit German forces to occupy border regions of Czechoslovakia, despite previous guarantees to the Czechs. We all know what the result of that betrayal was!

In October 2019, President Donald Trump agreed to permit Turkish forces to occupy border regions of Kurdish-controlled territory in Syria, despite previous guarantees to the Kurds.

Chamberlain’s change of policy has gone down in history as a despicable betrayal, casting a long shadow of dishonor on Britain.

Trump’s change of policy will likewise be seen by history as casting a long shadow of dishonor on America, and on Trump. I am ashamed of this latter-day “Munich,” and of the dishonor it brings to my country.

Thomas Moylan, West Hempstead

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