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Letter: Trump-Ukraine saga unfolds in Washington

President Donald Trump speaks during a reception for

President Donald Trump speaks during a reception for a Hispanic Heritage Month, at the White House in Washington, DC, on Friday. Photo Credit: POOL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock/YURI GRIPAS

The memo about President Donald Trump’s phone call with Ukraine’s leader is hardly a wet water pistol, let alone a hot smoking gun [“Dems to launch formal impeachment inquiry,” News, Sept. 25].

I believe it shows no unconstitutional or criminal behavior. But Republicans should use the Democrats’ impeachment proceedings as an opportunity to investigate whether Vice President Joe Biden played a role in his son’s company’s lucrative business deals in Ukraine and China.

Richard Reif,

  Kew Gardens Hills

“He is not fit to be president — morally or intellectually.” These words are not a criticism of Donald Trump from some radical liberal. They were said by Republican Rep. Peter King in a February 2016 phone interview with Newsday.

After Trump’s election, King changed his tune, becoming one of the president’s loudest cheerleaders. Unfortunately, most other Republican lawmakers have joined him.

The Sept. 24 editorial, “No stonewalling on Ukraine,” clearly explained the false equivalency between Vice President Joe Biden’s interaction with that nation and Trump’s behavior as president.

The framers of the Constitution devised checks and balances to prevent such behavior. The unwillingness of King and most of his fellow Republicans to implement those checks is appalling.

Margaret Bell,

West Islip

I think the whistleblower in this Ukraine story should get a medal.

Finally, someone has some integrity and has come forward to tell what he or she has witnessed or heard. We have been told by our law enforcement that if you see something say something, well someone in this corrupt White House under Donald Trump finally has.

Trump has gotten away with so much, before and after he became president, but always seems to slither away unscathed. Hopefully, he will finally be held accountable.

Ann Leahy,

  Wantagh

The latest congressional investigation into President Donald Trump was detailed from the front page to Page A4 Thursday, and Page A5 carefully laid out the steps to impeachment.

Page A6 reported that Iran, although staggering under the weight of sanctions and with representatives at the United Nations at the same time as Trump, “won’t work on a new nuclear deal.”

Is there a connection? Of course, there is. Why should Iran try to negotiate with a U.S. president who is taking a hard line toward it, when that president is having his legs cut out from under him at home? Far better to wait two years (or maybe even less!) and negotiate with a new president who might be more pliable. Iran could hope to get relief from sanctions, and build nuclear weapons, too.

Wednesday was a good day for Iran and a bad day for the United States. As we blithely destroy ourselves from within, it is well to remember that we weaken ourselves without at the same time.

Louis Sroka,

  Plainview

So House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has started an impeachment inquiry.

Excuse me if I see it as nothing but a veiled attempt to help her members who are being challenged by left-wing candidates who say they would vote for impeachment.

But at what cost? The country is being torn in half, and we are not working to address problems with Iran, China, trade treaties, the economy and jobs. All this to save a group of politicians. Pelosi and Democrats, have you no shame?

Philip Nicholas,

  Port Jefferson

The impeachment inquiry might test Joe Biden’s belief that Republicans and Democrats can work together. At this preliminary stage, it appears likely that the Democratic House will vote to impeach. It also appears likely that the Republican Senate will not convict.

Will members of either party stand with members of the opposing party on any issues that arise?

I’m led to wonder what a man of conscience, Sen. John McCain, would think and do if he were alive today.

Chris Marzuk,

  Greenlawn

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