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Too much info on the Baldwins

Alec Baldwin and Hilaria Baldwin attend the American

Alec Baldwin and Hilaria Baldwin attend the American Museum Of Natural History 2019 Gala at the American Museum of Natural History on Nov. 21, 2019 in New York City. Credit: Getty Images/Jamie McCarthy

When there are more important local events and people to report on, why are there continuously articles on the Baldwin family in Newsday [“Baldwin hits back at internet trolls,” Flash!, Nov. 28]? It seems that everything Alec Baldwin and his family go through is reported in depth.

My friends and I are tired of hearing about their tribulations, especially about Hilaria Baldwin’s two recent miscarriages. I don’t wish that on anyone, but many people go through this and it doesn’t need to be reported on.

Francine Shillet,

  Commack

Comic strip was inappropriate

Most of your daily comics are funny, but “The Argyle Sweater” is in a different category. I’ve seen it as weird for no reason and not really enjoyable.

The Nov. 27 strip with the caption “S&M&M” was the worst yet. A creature holds a whip over an M&M candy character that is tied to a bed headboard. The M&M says, “My safe word is ‘dentist.’ ”

This is not a “comic,” and it certainly is not suitable for young readers. A comic about sexual sadism and masochism does not belong in a family newspaper.

The drastic lowering of standards in comics and music and on talk shows in attempts to be funny or entertaining has gone on for decades, but this rubbish hurts us all — and especially younger people who think that gutter talk and thought are the new norm.

Stephen Geoghan,

  East Moriches

The president and military justice

A reader defended President Donald Trump’s intrusion into the military justice system [“The president is in charge of the military,” Letters, Dec. 3].

The writer appears to share Trump’s disdain for honor, a chain of command and ethics. Our people in military service are professionals, not thugs. They are accountable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

To excuse criminal behavior, as Trump did, is deeply insulting to those who served honorably and sacrificed greatly. Trump’s issues with authority and what I see as his inability to comprehend courage and discipline make him unfit to serve as commander in chief.

To compare desegregation efforts under President Harry Truman with Trump’s interference in the punishment of a Navy chief petty officer convicted of posing for a photo with a dead militant’s body is inane.

Cynthia Lovecchio,

  Glen Cove

As a retired Navy man, it bothers me greatly when President Donald Trump has a say about military procedure. He received four deferments from the Vietnam-era draft because he was in college, and a fifth that his 2016 campaign said was granted because of bone spurs in both heels.

It is laughable to see him salute because he avoided the military. When I hear him called commander in chief, I am disgusted. His criticism of Sen. John McCain for being caught and imprisoned by the Viet Cong still bothers me.

Robert Stonelli,

  Sayville

Editor’s note: The writer served in the Navy from 1956 to 1975.

Praise for company holding coats

I read the article “Coat owners out in the cold after furrier’s death” [Business, Nov. 20] and felt compelled to commend David Gravagna of Bennett Movers for holding on to coats moved from Morton’s Furs in Oceanside after its proprietor died.

Bennett is holding the coats so they can be returned to their mostly elderly owners.

With so many horrible stories about people, businesses and politicians taking advantage of others, it was refreshing to read about a company taking steps at its own expense to help others.

Marie Polifrone,

  Hewlett

Legislator betrays his fiscal concern

Suffolk County Legis. Rob Trotta once again exposed himself as a fiscal phony with his vote on the 2020 county budget.

On Nov. 6, Trotta (R-Fort Salonga) and Leslie Kennedy (R-Nesconset) were the only two legislators to vote against the proposed Suffolk County budget [“Suffolk OKs $3.2B budget,” News, Nov. 7].

However, two weeks later, after County Executive Bellone, a Democrat, vetoed the budget because it would increase taxes, spending and debt, Trotta and Kennedy suddenly flipped their votes to support it [“Override bid on Bellone veto falls just short,” News, Nov. 24].

So, after spending his reelection campaign peddling a false narrative to the public about the county being on the brink of financial collapse, Trotta voted for legislation that would increase taxes and spending and add to the county debt.

Jan Singer,

  Smithtown

Editor’s note: The writer, a Democrat, was defeated by Trotta in the Nov. 5 legislative election.

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