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Steve Levy speaks out

Then-Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy on Sept. 12,

Then-Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy on Sept. 12, 2008. Credit: Newsday/Ana P. Gutierrez

Daily Point

Two county executives speak about Spota

Former Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy, speaking Friday in more detail than ever about why he suddenly ended his political career in 2011 and relinquished $4 million in campaign funds, said he acted out of fear of then-District Attorney Tom Spota and the Suffolk County Police Department.

"I was being targeted, but if I said it eight years ago people would have said that I am delusional and paranoid," Levy told The Point. "I have been wanting to get this off my chest for eight years."

To read the complete interview, click here.

—Rita Ciolli @RitaCiolli

Talking Point

The Hub in new hands

The Nassau Hub is now in the hands of new Hempstead Town Supervisor Don Clavin.

Just before Christmas, RXR Realty and Onexim Sports and Entertainment, who hope to develop the Hub, filed a petition, maps and other documentation with the Town of Hempstead. It’ll be up to Clavin and the Hempstead Town board to move the project forward.

Nassau County Executive Laura Curran noted the developers’ submission to the town while addressing a Long Island Association breakfast meeting Friday morning. She added that the state has also agreed to disburse the $85 million in parking garage funds necessary to get the project started.

Curran said she has had “good conversations” with Clavin about the plans for the Hub.

“I’m confident we’re going to get this done,” Curran said.

The developers’ plans include proposed changes to the current zoning for the land around Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, which was approved in 2010 after the town rejected the late Charles Wang’s Lighthouse Project. 

And Clavin, who attended the breakfast, told The Point that the town is willing to consider potential zoning changes.

“I look forward to working with the county, the developers and the board members to make this a success,” Clavin said. “Long Island needs this and Nassau County needs this to be successful.”

According to the documents filed with the town, the developers are asking Hempstead to allow any building to be up to 100 feet tall, which is currently the maximum height for hotels only. They also want to forgo the town’s limit of six residential units per building, in part because their plan for 500 units would otherwise require the construction of 80 smaller residential buildings.

Then there’s parking. The town’s rules would require 13,488 parking spaces for the development, according to the developers’ submission. RXR and Onexim suggest a scenario where they provide 6,750 spaces on site — a combination of parking structures, street parking, and open lots — and then utilize the Omni and RXR Plaza buildings’ parking facilities to provide another 6,000 spaces.

The documents also provide more details on what RXR and Onexim are planning for the property. It’s 71.6 acres, not including the relatively new Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center facility, and will include 2.765 million square feet of development.

Within that total, Onexim and RXR are proposing as much as 625,000 square feet of residential space - a total of 500 units. The hotel could amount to 702,000 square feet, and a total of 850 rooms. A 600-seat movie theater and 1,000-seat performing arts space are also in the proposal, along with 60,000 square feet of restaurant space. General office space and the research and development plans, which will include the Northwell Health innovation center, will take up 950,000 square feet of space.

All of that is still a far cry from the Lighthouse Project, on which Wang partnered with Rechler. Buildings were going to be as high as 35 stories tall, and the development featured more than 2,300 residential units. 

—Randi F. Marshall @RandiMarshall

Pencil Point

Making the grade

For more cartoons, visit www.newsday.com/opinion

Final Point

Who said it? Day 3

Here’s a major thesis from different Democratic presidential candidates’ books. Who’s who? 

  • “The founders read Thucydides. They knew that once factions sever the bonds of trust embodied in laws, norms, and traditions; once every disagreement becomes irreconcilable and we pursue the good of our party with complete disregard for the good of our country; and when we treat politics as a tribal war...we lose the ability to do anything worthy of our roles.”
  • The candidate is proud of this observation from a pollster: “[The candidate is] not moving a party to the left. He’s moving a generation to the left.”
  • This candidate gets worked up by the idea that financial institutions should self-regulate: “Voluntary regulations? Jeez, can you imagine Tony Soprano in a world of voluntary regulations?”

For answers to today's quotes and past days' quotes, click here.

—Mark Chiusano @mjchiusano

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