TODAY'S PAPER
Clear 30° Good Afternoon
Clear 30° Good Afternoon
Opinion

Newsday's presidential endorsements

These are the candidates Newsday has endorsed for president since the paper began publishing in 1940.

2016 — Hillary Clinton

In 2016, the editorial board endorsed Hillary Clinton,
Photo Credit: Alex Wong / Getty Images

In 2016, the editorial board endorsed Hillary Clinton, who was running against Donald Trump. The board wrote, "She is realistic about our nation's problems and resolute about fixing them. Her unbroken belief in the dream of America, and her commitment to the right of every American to have a chance to achieve that, make Hillary Clinton the right choice to be our president." Click here to read the full endorsement.

2012 — Mitt Romney

In 2012, the editorial board endorsed Mitt Romney,
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Don Emmert

In 2012, the editorial board endorsed Mitt Romney, who was running against President Barack Obama. The board wrote, "What Romney has actually shown in his political evolution is a willingness to represent the will of his constituencies. We hope that means a lack of dogmatic zealotry, rather than a lack of leadership."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

2008 — Barack Obama

In 2008, the editorial board endorsed Barack Obama,
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Chris McGrath

In 2008, the editorial board endorsed Barack Obama, who was running against Sen. John McCain. The board wrote, "Obama has advanced big themes at a time when the nation faces big challenges. We believe he is ready to be the president of the United States."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

2004 — John Kerry

In 2004, the editorial board endorsed John Kerry,
Photo Credit: AP

In 2004, the editorial board endorsed John Kerry, who was running against George W. Bush. The board wrote, "Kerry is not an ideologue, and his desire for success makes him more likely to compromise and find common ground with his opposition. He is the one candidate who can begin to heal the deeply bitter divisions in the nation. Bush cannot and will not do that. By his own words, he is what he is."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

2000 — Al Gore

In 2000, the editorial board endorsed Al Gore,
Photo Credit: AP / Amy Sancetta

In 2000, the editorial board endorsed Al Gore, who was running against George W. Bush. The board wrote, "Gore has presented a moderate, centrist blueprint for governance that places a high premium on maintaining the government's newfound fiscal integrity. It is the sense of this."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1996 — Bill Clinton

In 1996, the editorial board endorsed Bill Clinton,
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images

In 1996, the editorial board endorsed Bill Clinton, who was running against Bob Dole. The board wrote, "Don't be misled by the petty, negative, disingenuous and just plain unappealing tone of this presidential campaign. This election matters. There are significant differences between the candidates and important issues that the next president will have to confront. Whether he is Bob Dole or Bill Clinton will make a difference."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1992 — Bill Clinton

In 1992, the editorial board endorsed Bill Clinton,
Photo Credit: AP

In 1992, the editorial board endorsed Bill Clinton, who was running against George H.W. Bush. The board wrote, "The Democratic nominee and his running mate, Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee, have demonstrated a depth of knowledge and passion on the issues, a commitment to pushing beyond the strictures of old thinking and a zeal for governing - as well as a zest for life - that make them the best of a new generation of leaders."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1988 — Michael Dukakis

In 1988, the editorial board endorsed Michael Dukakis,
Photo Credit: AP / Jim Cole

In 1988, the editorial board endorsed Michael Dukakis, who was running against George H.W. Bush. The board wrote, "In Dukakis, Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev will have a worthy adversary across the table. We have no doubt that Dukakis' Supreme Court and federal court appointees will be in the mainstream of U.S. political thinking. In contrast, we fear Bush will cave in to the far right wing of his party. And after eight years of scandal, we think it's time for a change."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1972 — 1984: No endorsements

Newsday did not endorse in the 1972, 1976,
Photo Credit: AP

Newsday did not endorse in the 1972, 1976, 1980 and 1984 presidential races. In 1981, Newsday decided to change the policy back to allowing endorsements, but still opted not to endorse in 1984. Click here to read the reasoning behind the policy change in 1972.

1968 — Richard Nixon

In 1968, the editorial board endorsed Richard Nixon,
Photo Credit: AP

In 1968, the editorial board endorsed Richard Nixon, who was running against Hubert Humphrey and George Wallace. The board wrote, "The election of Richard Nixon is a political necessity. The experience he has gained in victory and defeat has tempered him with a dispassionate view of his country, his party and himself. He is on record with the determination to choose a government of able men from both parties. Bearing no personal responsibility for the policies in Vietnam, he possesses a freedom that will be indispensable in any political settlement of the war."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1964 — Lyndon B. Johnson

In 1964, the editorial board endorsed Lyndon B.
Photo Credit: AP

In 1964, the editorial board endorsed Lyndon B. Johnson, who was running against Barry Goldwater. The board wrote, "Lyndon B. Johnson indicated his capacity for leadership as an accomplished majority leader of the Senate. Since, as President, he has demonstrated his unusual abilities of leadership by tactics of both persuasion and compromise, and the show of strength when required."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1960 — John F. Kennedy

In 1960, the editorial board endorsed John F.
Photo Credit: AP

In 1960, the editorial board endorsed John F. Kennedy, who was running against Richard Nixon. The board wrote, "He has the qualities the courage and the convictions to make us again what we were at the conclusion of World War II -- a rock and symbol for all who love freedom." Newsday's president and editor-in-chief wrote a dissenting editorial, explaining why he preferred Nixon.
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1956 — Adlai Stevenson

In 1956, the editorial board endorsed Adlai Stevenson,
Photo Credit: AP

In 1956, the editorial board endorsed Adlai Stevenson, who was running against Dwight D. Eisenhower. The board wrote, "We prefer the leadership and promise of Stevenson's forward-looking "new America" to the complacency of Eisenhower's "peace, prosperity and progress."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1952 — Dwight D. Eisenhower

In 1952, the editorial board endorsed Dwight D.
Photo Credit: AP

In 1952, the editorial board endorsed Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was running against Adlai Stevenson. The board wrote, "We hope it comes out with Eisenhower as President [but] the United States, with two good men running, is luckier than it has been in years."
Click here to read the full endorsement.

1948 — No endorsement

In 1948, the editorial board did not endorse,
Photo Credit: AP

In 1948, the editorial board did not endorse, but instead invited politicians and readers to submit their endorsements for president. They ran on Mondays before the election.

1944 — No FDR, maybe Dewey

In 1944, despite writing positively about candidate Thomas
Photo Credit: STF / AFP / Getty Images

In 1944, despite writing positively about candidate Thomas Dewey, the editorial board did not outright endorse him. Instead the paper ran a non-endorsement of Franklin D. Roosevelt because of concerns over his seeking a fourth term. It read, "If Roosevelt is re-elected we will be well on the way to a totalitarian form of government." Click here to read the full editorial.

1940 — For and against FDR

In 1940, Newsday's publisher and president disagreed over

In 1940, Newsday's publisher and president disagreed over endorsing Franklin D. Roosevelt and wrote two opposing editorials making their cases. Click here to read the full editorials.

Columns