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Photos: Orphan hawk 'adopted' in the skies

This season, the Volunteers for Wildlife rehabilitation center in Locust Valley took in six young red-tailed hawks, an unusually high number. Besides trying to reunite them with their parents there is another tool for wildlife rehabilitators: foster parenting. Click here to read more about how this works.

Naturalist Jim Jones and animal rehabilitator Lauren Schulz
Photo Credit: Brianna Cornachio

Naturalist Jim Jones and animal rehabilitator Lauren Schulz of Volunteers for Wildlife prepare a second young red-tailed hawk for placement in an oak tree at Bethpage State Park on July 7, 2018. The hawk was the second orphan placed in the tree in hopes that two adult hawks would care for it. The effort was a success

Volunteers for Wildlife rehabilitator Lauren Schulz prepares a
Photo Credit: Yael Weiss

Volunteers for Wildlife rehabilitator Lauren Schulz prepares a second young red-tailed hawk for placement in an oak tree at Bethpage State Park on July 7, 2018. The hawk was the second orphan placed in the tree in hopes that two adult hawks would care for it. The effort was a success.

A young red-tailed hawk sits on an oak
Photo Credit: Jim Jones

A young red-tailed hawk sits on an oak branch at Bethpage State Park just after it was placed there by members of Volunteers for Wildlife on July 7, 2018. The hawk was the second orphan placed in the tree in hopes that two adult hawks would care for it. The effort was a success.

Brianna Cornachio, an animal rehabilitator for Volunteers for
Photo Credit: Jim Jones

Brianna Cornachio, an animal rehabilitator for Volunteers for Wildlife, with a young red-tailed hawk before it was placed in a nest high in an oak tree at Bethpage State Park on July 2, 2018. The hawk, an orphan, was placed in the nest in hopes that two adult hawks would care for it. The effort was a success. 

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