TODAY'S PAPER
Overcast 33° Good Evening
Overcast 33° Good Evening
SportsBaseballMets

Meet the Mets for 2013

Ruben Tejada takes a swing before batting practice

Ruben Tejada takes a swing before batting practice during a spring training workout at Tradition Field. (Feb. 12, 2013) Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

Newsday beat writer Marc Carig gives a quick take on Mets players heading into the 2013 season.

SCOTT ATCHISON, relieverIt's not a glamorous job but
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

SCOTT ATCHISON, reliever
It's not a glamorous job but somebody has to pitch the low-leverage innings. In this role, Atchison is battled-tested from his days in the AL East. |

MIKE BAXTER, outfielder Marlon Byrd squeezed Baxter out
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

MIKE BAXTER, outfielder
Marlon Byrd squeezed Baxter out of the picture in right field. But if Byrd falters, Baxter would make sense as a platoon-mate against righthanded pitchers. |

JOHN BUCK, catcher The veteran may provide some
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

JOHN BUCK, catcher
The veteran may provide some pop in a lineup that could use some. But he'll take a backseat as soon as prospect Travis d'Arnaud shows he’s ready. |

GREG BURKE, reliever It has only been a
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

GREG BURKE, reliever
It has only been a year since his conversion into a submariner. But if he continues generating Chad Bradford-esque groundball rates, the Mets might have found a huge bargain in Burke. |

MARLON BYRD, outfielder He looked awful last year
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

MARLON BYRD, outfielder
He looked awful last year with the Cubs and Red Sox -- and that was before his PED suspension. But the Mets hope that a successful stint in winter ball revived his career. |

COLLIN COWGILL, outfielder Few enjoyed a stronger camp
Photo Credit: AP

COLLIN COWGILL, outfielder
Few enjoyed a stronger camp than Cowgill, whose speed and athleticism put him in line for at least a platoon job in center field against lefthanded pitchers. |

IKE DAVIS, first baseman The days of real
Photo Credit: Patrick E. McCarthy

IKE DAVIS, first baseman
The days of real contention could come sooner if the slugging first baseman shows that he's capable of anchoring the middle of the lineup for a full season. |

LUCAS DUDA, outfielder Only if he makes good
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

LUCAS DUDA, outfielder
Only if he makes good on his power potential will his subpar defense in left field be worthwhile for the Mets to stomach for a full season. |

JOSH EDGIN, reliever He's homegrown and works cheap,
Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac

JOSH EDGIN, reliever
He's homegrown and works cheap, which the Mets can use after blowing big bucks recently on bullpen busts. He'll have a chance to solidify his niche as a lefty specialist. |

JEURYS FAMILIA, reliever Though he hasn't worked out
Photo Credit: Getty

JEURYS FAMILIA, reliever
Though he hasn't worked out as a starting pitcher, he showed in spring training why the Mets believe his stuff might play up as a reliever. |

PEDRO FELICIANO, reliever Though he never threw a
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

PEDRO FELICIANO, reliever
Though he never threw a pitch in two injury-plagued seasons with the Yankees, Feliciano has shown in camp that even after shoulder surgery, he's still no picnic for lefties. |

FRANK FRANCISCO, reliever In the best-case scenario, the
Photo Credit: David Pokress

FRANK FRANCISCO, reliever
In the best-case scenario, the Mets have themselves an overpriced seventh-inning guy. Worst case? The ex-closer's balky right elbow never feels quite right and the Mets get zero return for $6 million. |

DILLON GEE, starter Was Gee due for regression
Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac

DILLON GEE, starter
Was Gee due for regression before a blood clot prematurely ended his season? Or was he ready to roll with his success? We'll find out now that he’s healthy again. |

MATT HARVEY, starter Even if he regresses from
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

MATT HARVEY, starter
Even if he regresses from the numbers he posted following last year's July callup, Harvey isn't going anywhere. His future as rotation mainstay is now. |

LATROY HAWKINS, reliever He may be 40, but
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

LATROY HAWKINS, reliever
He may be 40, but make no mistake: the veteran still brings some heat. Hawkins has lost little off a low 90s fastball that he can command. |

JEREMY HEFNER, starter Every organization needs pitchers such
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

JEREMY HEFNER, starter
Every organization needs pitchers such as Hefner, who has embraced life as a swingman. He'll begin the season in the rotation but could stick as a long reliever and spot starter. |

BRANDON LYON, reliever The veteran roared back last
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

BRANDON LYON, reliever
The veteran roared back last year -- finding a way to up his strikeout rate -- just one season removed from shoulder issues. Smart signing by the Mets. |

SHAUN MARCUM, starter When he's healthy, Marcum lives
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

SHAUN MARCUM, starter
When he's healthy, Marcum lives up to his reputation as a savvy righthander who gets outs despite limited stuff. Of course, he has rarely been healthy. |

DANIEL MURPHY, second baseman Nobody will mistake him
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

DANIEL MURPHY, second baseman
Nobody will mistake him for a Gold Glover. But he showed major growth by simply learning to handle his duties at second base. |

JONATHON NIESE, starter He's no ace, but the
Photo Credit: AP

JONATHON NIESE, starter
He's no ace, but the world needs good mid-rotation guys, too. The Mets' Opening Day starter has shown all the signs of settling into that role. |

KIRK NIEUWENHUIS, outfielder During camp, he could have
Photo Credit: David Pokress

KIRK NIEUWENHUIS, outfielder
During camp, he could have solidified his claim to start in center field. Instead, he suffered a bone bruise on a routine slide into second base. |

BOBBY PARNELL, closer He's endured mixed results in
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

BOBBY PARNELL, closer
He's endured mixed results in his previous attempts as a closer. But this is the first time he's trying it with the devastating curveball he learned from Jason Isringhausen last season. |

OMAR QUINTANILLA, utility He proved himself to be
Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac

OMAR QUINTANILLA, utility
He proved himself to be a steady utilityman with the Mets and Orioles last season. His ability to play shortstop will give him a chance to reprise the role this year. |

ANTHONY RECKER, catcher A typical backup catcher --
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

ANTHONY RECKER, catcher
A typical backup catcher -- solid behind the plate and a non-factor at the plate. He'll likely be out of a spot once Travis d'Arnaud gets promoted. |

JOHAN SANTANA, starter If it wasn't already clear
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

JOHAN SANTANA, starter
If it wasn't already clear that both sides can't wait for this arrangement to be finished, this spring's shoulder fatigue drama removed all doubt. |

RUBEN TEJADA, shortstop He'll be surely miscast as
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

RUBEN TEJADA, shortstop
He'll be surely miscast as a top-of-the-lineup hitter. But that shouldn't detract from the fact that he's grown into a solid big-league shortstop. |

JUSTIN TURNER, utility An everyday player he is
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

JUSTIN TURNER, utility
An everyday player he is not. But Turner's pinch-hitting ability off the bench and his versatility in the field will surely help him find some playing time. |

JORDANY VALDESPIN, outfielder His athleticism and clear knack
Photo Credit: Newsday/Alejandra Villa

JORDANY VALDESPIN, outfielder
His athleticism and clear knack for the game also comes with a long track record of maturity issues. But the Mets can make use of his talent. |

DAVID WRIGHT, third baseman Will be interesting to
Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac

DAVID WRIGHT, third baseman
Will be interesting to watch how the Mets' new captain handles the weighty expectations that come with a weighty paycheck from his eight-year, $138-million extension. |

New York Sports