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Tom Brady blocked from getting Tom Terrific trademark

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office rejected Tom

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office rejected Tom Brady's attempt to trademark the nickname "Tom Terrific," which the patent office said "points uniquely and unmistakably to Tom Seaver."   Credit: AP/David Durochik

It’s official — there is only one Tom Terrific. And it’s not Tom Brady. It’s Mets legend Tom Seaver, of course.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday rejected Brady’s application for ownership of the nickname “Tom Terrific,” according to The Associated Press.

“The nickname Tom Terrific points uniquely and unmistakably to Tom Seaver, and the fame or reputation of Tom Seaver as ‘Tom Terrific’ is such that a connection between Mr. Seaver and the applied-for goods would be presumed,” the ruling states.

Brady, the Patriots’ future Hall of Fame quarterback, said in June that he regretted applying for the trademark after a firestorm of criticism from Mets fans. They felt he was trying to take something that belonged to Seaver, the Hall of Fame pitcher also known as “The Franchise.”

Brady, who did not withdraw the application, said he never planned to use “Tom Terrific” but just wanted to stop other people from using it in his name to make money.

“It’s unfortunate,” he said. “I was actually trying to do something because I didn’t like the nickname and I wanted to make sure no one used it because some people wanted to use it. I was trying to keep people from using it and then it got spun around to something different than what it is . . . It wasn’t something I was trying to do out of any disrespect or ill manner or anything like that.”

Brady has six months to appeal the USPTO ruling.

Seaver does not have a trademark for either of his nicknames, according to USPTO records. The records show Brady currently owns one trademark: “TB12,” which is Brady’s exercise and nutrition program.

Seaver, 74, has retired from public life because of dementia. He did not attend the Mets’ ceremony to honor the 1969 championship team in August. In June, the Mets changed the address of Citi Field to 41 Seaver Way. The club also announced plans to erect a statue of Seaver outside the stadium.

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