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MLB's 300-game winners

Meet the 24 pitchers in MLB history that have won at least 300 games.

CY YOUNG, RHP Career record: 511-316 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

CY YOUNG, RHP
Career record: 511-316 || Hall of Fame: 1937
Denton True "Cy" Young pitched 22 seasons from 1890-1911 for five teams: the Cleveland Spiders, St. Louis Perfectos, Boston Americans/Red Sox, Cleveland Naps and Boston Rustlers. Young holds the records for most wins (511), loses (316), innings pitched (7,354.2), games started (815) and complete games (749). The annual Cy Young Award is named in his honor.

WALTER JOHNSON, RHP Career record: 417-279 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

WALTER JOHNSON, RHP
Career record: 417-279 || Hall of Fame: 1936
Known as "The Big Train," Walter Johnson pitched 21 years from 1907-1927 — all with the Washington Senators. He is the all-time MLB leader in shutouts (110) and led the AL in strikeouts a record 12 times. Johnson was also the first member of the 3,000-strikeout club.

GROVER CLEVELAND ALEXANDER, RHP Career record: 373-208 ||
Photo Credit: AP

GROVER CLEVELAND ALEXANDER, RHP
Career record: 373-208 || Hall of Fame: 1938
Grover Cleveland Alexander's 20-year career spanned 1911-1930 with the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals. Nicknamed "Old Pete," he won the NL pitcher's Triple Crown (led league in wins, ERA and strikeouts) in 1915, 1916 and 1920. He is still the NL leader with 90 career shutouts.

CHRISTY MATHEWSON, RHP Career record: 373-188 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

CHRISTY MATHEWSON, RHP
Career record: 373-188 || Hall of Fame: 1936
In 17 seasons from 1900-1916, Christy Mathewson pitched for the New York Giants and Cincinnati Reds. "Big Six" won 30 or more games in a season four times in his career. He also won the NL pitcher's Triple Crown in 1905 and 1908.

PUD GALVIN, RHP Career record: 365-310 || Hall
Photo Credit: Goodwin & Company

PUD GALVIN, RHP
Career record: 365-310 || Hall of Fame: 1965
James Francis "Pud" Galvin was known as the "Little Steam Engine" because of his durability. He had a 19-year MLB career lasting from 1874-1892. He was the first pitcher ever to win 300 games and the only player in history to win 20 or more games in 10 different years without winning a league pennant. He pitched for six different teams: the St. Louis Brown Stockings, Buffalo Bisons, Pittsburgh Alleghenys, Pittsburgh Burghers, Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Browns.

WARREN SPAHN, LHP Career record: 363-245 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

WARREN SPAHN, LHP
Career record: 363-245 || Hall of Fame: 1973
Warren Spahn won 363 games, but he could have won more. After breaking into the league in 1942, he missed the next three seasons serving in World War II (where he saw action at the Battle of the Bulge). The 17-time All-Star played 21 seasons from 1942-1965 for the Boston/Milwaukee Braves, Mets and San Francisco Giants. He has the most wins among left-handed pitchers and the most wins of any pitcher after 1920.

KID NICHOLS, RHP Career record: 361-208 || Hall
Photo Credit: Public domain

KID NICHOLS, RHP
Career record: 361-208 || Hall of Fame: 1949
Charles Augustus Nichols pitched 15 seasons from 1890-1906 for the Boston Beaneaters, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies. He won 30 or more games in a season seven times, which helped him become the youngest pitcher to reach the 300-win plateau; Nichols was just 30 when he won his 300th game.

GREG MADDUX, RHP Career record: 355-227 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

GREG MADDUX, RHP
Career record: 355-227 || Hall of Fame eligible: 2014
Though his stuff was far from overpowering, Maddux relied on hitting his spots with impeccable control. He played for the Cubs, Braves, Dodgers and Padres in his 23-year career from 1986-2008. Maddux was the winningest pitcher of the 1990s with 176 wins, and won a record 18 Gold Gloves. He also was the first pitcher to win four consecutive Cy Young Awards (1992-95) and the only one to win at least 15 games for 17 straight seasons.

ROGER CLEMENS, RHP Career record: 354-184 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

ROGER CLEMENS, RHP
Career record: 354-184 || Hall of Fame eligible: 2013
"The Rocket" was as dominant a starting pitcher as anyone. In 23 seasons from 1984-2007, Clemens took home a record seven Cy Young Awards. He played for the Red Sox, Blue Jays, Yankees and Astros. Clemens recorded his 300th win and 4,000th strikeout in the same game (June 13, 2003). Steroid allegations over the past few years have cast a cloud on Clemens' on-field accomplishments.

TIM KEEFE, RHP Career record: 342-225 || Hall
Photo Credit: Goodwin & Company

TIM KEEFE, RHP
Career record: 342-225 || Hall of Fame: 1964
"Smiling Tim" Keefe broke into the league in 1880 and recorded the lowest single-season ERA in MLB history with a 0.86 mark in 105 innings. In 13 seasons, he played for the Troy Trojans, New York Metropolitans, New York Giants, New York Giants of the short-lived Player's League and Philadelphia Phillies. Keefe won at least 40 games twice. His final season in the league was the same year in which pitchers began throwing from 60 feet, 6 inches.

STEVE CARLTON, LHP Career record: 329-244 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

STEVE CARLTON, LHP
Career record: 329-244 || Hall of Fame: 1994
Steve Carlton was a 10-time All-Star for the Cardinals, Phillies, Giants, White Sox, Indians and Twins during 24 years from 1965-1988. He is second in wins and strikeouts for a left-handed pitcher. He was also the first pitcher to win four career Cy Young Awards. Carlton is the last NL pitcher to win at least 25 games in a season, and the last to throw at least 300 innings in a single year. But arguably his most remarkable feat came in 1972; that year, he won 27 games, or 46 percent of the 59-97 Phillies’ wins.

JOHN CLARKSON, RHP Career record: 328-178 || Hall
Photo Credit: Public domain

JOHN CLARKSON, RHP
Career record: 328-178 || Hall of Fame: 1963
John Clarkson was one of the stars of the dead-ball era. He pitched 12 years from 1882-1894 for the Worcester Ruby Legs, Chicago White Stockings, Boston Beaneaters and Cleveland Spiders. He won 53 games in 1885, the second most wins in a season (behind Charles Radbourn's 59 in 1884). Clarkson threw at least 600 innings in a season twice i (1885, 1889). In just five seasons from 1885-89, he won 209 games. When he retired in 1894, he was the winningest pitcher in NL history.

EDDIE PLANK, LHP Career record: 326-194 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

EDDIE PLANK, LHP
Career record: 326-194 || Hall of Fame: 1946
Eddie Plank's 17-year pitching career lasted from 1901-1917. During that time, he amassed the most career shutouts by a left-handed pitcher (66). "Gettysburg Eddie" won 20-plus games in a season eight times and was the first lefty pitcher to win 300. He pitched for the Philadelphia Athletics, St. Louis Terriers and St. Louis Browns.

NOLAN RYAN, RHP Career record: 324-292 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

NOLAN RYAN, RHP
Career record: 324-292 || Hall of Fame: 1999
"The Ryan Express" starred in the big leagues from 1966-1993, the longest career by any player in history. He has the most career strikeouts (5,714), but also the most career walks (2,795). In addition to the Mets, Ryan pitched for the Angels, Astros and Rangers. He holds the MLB record with seven no-hitters; he also threw 12 one-hitters. Despite all his success, he never won a Cy Young Award.

DON SUTTON, RHP Career record: 324-256 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

DON SUTTON, RHP
Career record: 324-256 || Hall of Fame: 1998
Don Sutton was often called "Black and Decker," known for doctoring baseballs with a block of sandpaper. Even so, the righty pitched 23 years from 1966-1988 for the Dodgers, Astros, Brewers, Athletics and Angels. Sutton actually holds the obscure MLB record of most career at-bats (1,354) without hitting a home run.

PHIL NIEKRO, RHP Career record: 318-274 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

PHIL NIEKRO, RHP
Career record: 318-274 || Hall of Fame: 1997
Phil Niekro has the most career wins for a knuckleball pitcher. "Knucksie" baffled hitters for 24 years from 1964-1987. He pitched for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, Yankees, Indians and Blue Jays. He and his brother Joe Niekro have the most combined wins (539) of any pair of brothers in MLB history. Niekro also holds the MLB record by winning 121 games after age 40.

GAYLORD PERRY RHP Career record: 314-265 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

GAYLORD PERRY RHP
Career record: 314-265 || Hall of Fame: 1991
Perry was known his elusive "spitball." Though the pitch was technically illegal, Perry was only ejected from a game for throwing it once in his career. He pitched 22 years from 1962-1983 for eight different teams: the Giants, Indians, Rangers, Padres, Yankees, Braves, Mariners and Royals. He was the first pitcher to win a Cy Young Award in each league.

TOM SEAVER, RHP Career record: 311-205 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

TOM SEAVER, RHP
Career record: 311-205 || Hall of Fame: 1992
A 12-time All-Star, “Tom Terrific” was the 1967 NL Rookie of the Year, and won three Cy Young Awards while with the Mets. Seaver won a league-high 25 games in 1969, leading the Mets to their first World Series title. Seaver's 20-year MLB career lasted from 1967-1986, and he played for the Mets, Reds, White Sox and Red Sox. Seaver had 108 starts for the Mets in which he pitched nine or more innings allowing one run or less. Seaver's 98.84 Hall of Fame voting percentage is the highest ever.

CHARLES RADBOURN, RHP Career record: 309-194 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

CHARLES RADBOURN, RHP
Career record: 309-194 || Hall of Fame: 1939
"Old Hoss" Radbourn pitched 12 years in the big leagues from 1880-1891 for the Buffalo Bisons, Providence Grays, Boston Beaneaters, Boston Reds and Cincinnati Reds. While pitching for the Grays in 1884, he set the MLB record for wins (59) in a season. An official scorer gave Radbourn a 60th win, saying Radbourn pitched best in his final game. However, Grays starter Cyclone Miller pitched the first five innings and was the pitcher of record, with Radbourn picking up the save instead.

MICKEY WELCH, RHP Career record: 307-210 || Hall
Photo Credit: Getty Images

MICKEY WELCH, RHP
Career record: 307-210 || Hall of Fame: 1973
Another dead-ball era pitcher, "Smiling Mickey" Welch pitched for the Troy Trojans and New York Giants during his 13-year career, from 1880-1892. He was third pitcher to reach the 300-win mark. The Brooklyn native won 20-plus games in a season nine times — seven of which were in a row.

TOM GLAVINE, LHP Career record: 305-203 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

TOM GLAVINE, LHP
Career record: 305-203 || Hall of Fame eligible: 2014
Like his long-time teammate Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine was far from overpowering. However, he made his living spotting his pitches on the corners of the plate. The 22-year veteran pitched for the Braves and the Mets. From 1987-2008, Glavine appeared in 10 All-Star games. He is second to Maddux for most wins during the 1990s with 164. Glavine also won 20-plus games five times in his career.

RANDY JOHNSON, LHP Career record: 303-166 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

RANDY JOHNSON, LHP
Career record: 303-166 || Hall of Fame: eligible: 2015
The 6-foot-10 Johnson was the most dominant and intimidating left-handed pitcher of all-time. "The Big Unit" relied on his overpowering fastball during his 22-year career from 1988-2009, in which he played for the Expos, Mariners, Astros, Diamondbacks, Yankees and Giants. He even once de-feathered a bird in a spring training game. Johnson finished his career first in strikeouts per nine innings pitched among starters (10.67), second in strikeouts (4,875) and first among LHPs. His five Cy Young Awards are second only to Roger Clemens' seven.

EARLY WYNN, RHP Career record: 300-244 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

EARLY WYNN, RHP
Career record: 300-244 || Hall of Fame: 1972
Early Wynn pitched for 25 seasons between 1939 and 1963. "Gus" was an eight-time All-Star for the Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. He won 20-plus games in a season five times. During the 1950s, Wynn struck out 1,544 batters — the most during the decade.

LEFTY GROVE, LHP Career record: 300-141 || Hall
Photo Credit: AP

LEFTY GROVE, LHP
Career record: 300-141 || Hall of Fame: 1947
Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove's career lasted 17 years from 1925-1941 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox. He led the AL in wins four separate seasons and the led the league in ERA nine times. Grove is eighth on the all-time winning percentage list at .680, including first among pitchers with more than 236 wins.

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