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The Domingo German situation has Aaron Boone's antenna up

Domingo German of the New York Yankees pitches

Domingo German of the New York Yankees pitches against the Los Angeles Angels at Yankee Stadium on Sept. 18, 2019. Credit: Jim McIsaac

TAMPA, Fla. — On Thursday night, Zack Britton didn’t run away from his critical comments earlier in the day regarding teammate Domingo German and his return to the Yankees after serving an 81-game suspension for violating MLB’s domestic violence policy.

And manager Aaron Boone, while taking note of Britton’s comments on social media, has no plans to intercede when it comes to German fitting back into the clubhouse.

"I think Brit answered a direct question honestly," Boone said Friday.

Asked about German, who will contend for a rotation spot in spring training, during a Zoom call with reporters on Thursday, Britton said in part: "Sometimes you don’t get to control who your teammates are, and that’s the situation. I don’t agree with what he did."

Challenged on social media later that night by a fan who told Britton ''you still don't know the circumstances of what took place,'' Britton didn’t back down, responding: "Hah you think I don’t know the circumstances? Get a clue bud. Was asked the question BTW, gave my answer. Don’t care if you are sensitive to it."

So was Britton speaking for himself or were the reliever’s comments a reflection of other players’ thoughts — and, if so, how many?

"I'm sure there's 1,000 shades of gray in there about how guys feel, certainly when serious situations come up away from the field, and I'm sure that exists throughout our clubhouse," Boone said. "So, like I said, it's something that my antenna’s up on and we'll continue to try and monitor it and watch it and handle it the best way possible."

Ready for his close-up

Righthander Jameson Taillon, acquired from the Pirates this winter, said he was excited to officially slip on the pinstripes for the first time Thursday, an event he commemorated with a picture.

"Everyone in baseball, every sports fan, knows what the Yankee pinstripes mean," Taillon said Friday. "And so [Thursday] putting it on, even just sitting at my locker, I took a picture in my pants just at my locker. I thought it was so cool. I didn't know how it was going to feel until you actually get here and you're a part of this and you start feeling like a part of the team and organization. So yeah, I mean, it's the Yankees. What else can you say?"

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