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Farm head Gary Denbo leaving Yankees to work for Derek Jeter’s Marlins

Then-Toronto Blue Jays hitting coach Gary Denbo poses

Then-Toronto Blue Jays hitting coach Gary Denbo poses for a photo on Feb. 22, 2008. Credit: AP / Keith Srakocic

The man who has overseen the Yankees farm system’s transformation into one of the best in baseball is headed to the Marlins to work for Derek Jeter.

Gary Denbo, the Yankees’ vice president of player development, will become the Marlins’ director of player development and scouting, according to sources. The Post first reported the move, which had been long expected and was considered to be fait accompli as soon as the Marlins’ sale became official.

Denbo has worked for the Yankees in a variety of roles over 23 years. He had been with the club the last eight years, the last three overseeing the minor leagues.

Denbo’s first stint with the club came in 1990 when he managed Class-A Prince William. He was Jeter’s first professional manager in 1992 with the Gulf Coast League Yankees and then with Low-A Greensboro in 1993, the start of a long friendship.

Jeter, even before becoming a part-owner of the Marlins, rarely came around the Yankees since retiring after the 2014 season. But, at Denbo’s request, Jeter took some of the organization’s top prospects to dinner each of the last two springs as part of the Captain’s Camp, instituted by Denbo to instill leadership skills in the minor leaguers.

It is not clear whom general manager Brian Cashman will tab to replace Denbo but two names likely to come up are Eric Schmitt, the Yankees’ director of minor-league operations, and John Kremer, the club’s director of performance science.

Denbo is well thought of in the industry but a straw poll of opposing team executives were split on how much of an impact on the Yankees his departure will have.

“As much as he’s done, it’s not just one guy that has helped all the players,” one said.

A second executive said, “Anytime you lose good people, it’s not good.”

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