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NCAA president Mark Emmert: Commission will recommend ways to fix college basketball

NCAA President Dr. Mark Emmert speaks to the

NCAA President Dr. Mark Emmert speaks to the media at the NCAA Final Four at the Alamodome on March 29, 2018 in San Antonio. Credit: Getty Images / Mike Lawrie

The recently formed independent Commission on College Basketball will unveil policy recommendations to fix the sport on Wednesday, NCAA president Mark Emmert said on Friday morning.

A federal investigation into corruption in college basketball has raised questions about the structure of college athletics. The federal charges were announced last September.

Emmert said the goal is to have the final versions of policy recommendations voted on by the NCAA’s executive board in August.

“For the NCAA’s democratic decision-making process, that’s light speed,” said Emmert, speaking to a group representing the Associated Press Sports Editors at AP headquarters in New York City.

The federal investigation into impermissible benefits from agents to players or their relatives keeps growing. Last week, Kansas and North Carolina State were the new schools engulfed in the scandal. According to a federal indictment released on April 10 in New York City, new allegations have an adidas official paying the parents of athletes willing to commit to those schools.

The Commission on College Basketball was formed in October in response to the FBI probe. It is chaired by Dr. Condoleezza Rice, the former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor who also was a professor at Stanford and served on the college football selection committee.

Emmert said he does not know what recommendations the commission will propose.

“Nothing is off the table for that commission,” he said.

The NCAA has come under criticism for being a multi-billion dollar industry — thanks to lucrative televisions deals for the college football playoff and NCAA men’s basketball tournament — and not sharing that money with its student-athletes.

Emmert reiterated on Friday he believes student-athletes should not be paid and said there needs to be more alternatives for those who want to bypass college to pursue professional careers.

“If you want to be a professional ball player, there should be a track for you to be a professional ball player,” he said.

Emmert said there were no one-and-done players participating in this year’s Final Four. He also praised national player of the year Jalen Brunson of Villanova, a junior guard who will graduate in three years and be in June’s NBA Draft.

“That’s a pretty good model,” Emmert said.

New York Sports