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Giants suspend Janoris Jenkins indefinitely for violating team rules

Giants cornerback Janoris Jenkins looks on from the

Giants cornerback Janoris Jenkins looks on from the sideline against the Pittsburgh Steelers in a preseason game at MetLife Stadium on Aug. 11, 2017. Credit: Kathleen Malone-Van Dyke

The Giants announced Tuesday that Pro Bowl cornerback Janoris Jenkins has been suspended indefinitely for violation of team rules after he did not show up Monday when the rest of the team reported from the bye week. Jenkins will miss at least Sunday’s game against the Rams, his former team.

The length of his suspension, which cannot exceed four weeks per the CBA, will be reviewed at the beginning of next week. Each week he is suspended will cost Jenkins $806,250 in salary.

“As a member of this team, there are standards, and we have responsibilities and obligations,” Ben McAdoo said in announcing the suspension through the team. “When we don’t fulfill those obligations, there are consequences. As I have said before, we do not like to handle our team discipline publicly. There are times when it is unavoidable, and this is one of those times.”

A year ago, the Giants secondary went by the nickname “NYPD,” which stood for New York Pass Defense. This year, they have run afoul of the team’s law more regularly than they have enforced it. In the season’s first seven weeks, the Giants benched Eli Apple for the start of a game and suspended Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie for a game. Jenkins will be the latest to miss game action.

On Monday, when it was clear Jenkins was not at practice, McAdoo said that he (along with Eli Apple and Paul Perkins) had been excused for “personal reasons.” That was not true in Jenkins’ case.

“At that point, neither myself nor any of the coaches had heard from Jackrabbit,” McAdoo said. “I did not speak with him directly until Tuesday morning.”

At that time, Jenkins was informed of his suspension.

Jenkins has been the Giants’ most consistent pass defender. After making the Pro Bowl last year, his first with the team, he has returned an interception for a touchdown against the Broncos, defensed six passes and made 24 tackles. His loss leaves a hole in the secondary that likely will be filled by Rodgers-Cromartie. He played only 14 snaps in the Giants’ last game, a loss to the Seahawks two weeks ago, when he returned after serving his one-game suspension.

Rodgers-Cromartie said Monday that he did not know what his role would be in the coming weeks.

“You control what you can control, man,” he said. “I’ll go out there in practice, be me, be entertaining, and do what I do. If I get out there, I get out there. If I don’t, I’m going to be cheering on the sideline. Know what I mean?

“One thing about me, baby, you’ll never get me down.”

That may not be completely true. Rodgers-Cromartie did storm off the field late in the game against the Chargers, left the building after a disagreement with McAdoo over being disciplined for the upcoming game, and eventually was suspended for one week. The Giants beat the Broncos without him.

Since his return, though, Rodgers-Cromartie has played off his outbursts as part of his quirky personality. “I’m dramatic, man. I’m crazy,” he said when he returned from the suspension. After playing such a limited role against the Seahawks — one that surely would have been even less had Jenkins not left the game at times with an undisclosed injury — Rodgers-Cromartie was calm and level-headed about his participation. He said he knew he’d have to earn his way back into good graces.

Now, it seems, Jenkins’ poor behavior will allow Rodgers-Cromartie to do that more quickly.

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